College, Preppers, & The Future

Instead of Providing “Safe Spaces” This University Teaches Survival Skills

Daisy Luther
Contributor, ZenGardner.com

Once upon a time, the goal of higher education was to prepare kids for life, but in past decades they’ve gotten further and further from that path. Now, in an era of crybabies and safe spaces, one university teaches survival skills and is completely bucking the status quo.

Frostburg State University has a freshman-level interdisciplinary course called Doomsday Preppers and Surviving the Unexpected Emergency, playing off the popularity of the National Geographic Channel’s show of the same name. In the class, Recreation and Parks Management Professor Robert Kauffman teaches disaster preparedness to help the kids get ready for a variety of scenarios. Kauffman is the author of a paper about “the rescue curve” that discusses the point at which injury, damage or loss can increase as time between an incident and an intervention increases. The class is now in its second semester of preparing students for emergencies, and the professor plans to continue it next year. Here’s a little bit more about the course:

In Kauffman’s class, he uses clips from “Castaway” and “Blast From the Past” among others to augment his examples of the psychological and physical effects of disaster preparedness.

As January’s snowstorm demonstrated, these skills come in handy whether stranded on a highway or isolated in your neighborhood.

Among the assignments in IDIS 150, students have to plan for short-term disasters and one-year disasters, take inventory of their food at home, design a shelter, determine how much in supplies and food they need, organize communication tools and, yes, learn how to prep for life in an underground bunker. But it’s the more likely scenarios that Kauffman really hopes the students will be prepared for.

“It is a reprocessing of your camping skills. Really, what we did is take the old-fashioned camping course and repackaged it,” Kauffman said. “The real emphasis is surviving the unexpected emergency we could be thrust into anytime, our car breaking down on the road, being stranded at a rest stop, or we just had a storm where people were stranded for three days.”

Ebersole, of New Enterprise, Pa., found the course helpful for when he goes hunting in the winter. He now makes sure he has an extra coat and supplies in his car for unexpected situations. It was a simple exercise in class that showed him why it’s important to have extra supplies.

“We pulled out everything from our pockets, and whatever you had with you at the time is what you’ll have during an emergency,” he said.

He also was well-prepared for the January snowstorm in part thanks to the class, having stocked up on enough food and supplies to make it until his neighborhood’s streets were cleared.

These kids are being prepared for actual life, toughening up by considering the possibilities, and gaining the confidence that comes from being ready to meet challenges.

Liberal Institutions of Wussification

This is in sharp contrast to what many colleges are teaching these days. Instead of nurturing competent kids into adults that can go out and conquer the world, they’re wrapping them in cotton and turning them into wusses who require shelter from mean words.

Just last week, Rutgers University was the scene of a dramatic protest with an aftermath that required trauma counseling. If you’re wondering what awful thing happened, there was a guest lecturer who hurt some of the students feelings. In protest, they smeared blood on their faces, because words. Words had wounded them.

Afterward, they had to seek help in a group therapy session to deal with the trauma of listening to another opinion. Many students said in the aftermath that they were fearful as they slunk around the campus for days after the event.

Protesters at the University of Missouri required a “safe space” to recuperate from the rigors of protesting, in which no one could say mean things to them and the media couldn’t report on them.

So unbelievably gutless are many young adults that numerous guides have been written about how to keep from offending, treading upon, or discriminating against anyone. (You can see a list of these guides here so you can laugh at themfollow the new rules of conduct.)

Matthew McConaughey gave the 2015 commencement speech at the University of Houston, and may not be invited back. ““Life’s not fair. It never was, isn’t now and won’t ever be. Do not fall into the entitled trap of feeling like you’re a victim. You are not.”

What do you think kids should be learning to prepare them for adult life?

If we really wanted kids to be prepared for an adult life full of accomplishments and freedom, we’d teach them that overcoming obstacles is the route to success, not hiding under your blankie. Never have I seen it so well said than in this essay by a combat veteran Marine.

If you were designing a course for life for kids stepping into adulthood, what would that course teach? Disaster preparedness? How to handle your finances? How to budget? Home economics? Shop? It seems that none of these things is included in education anymore, and we’re sending kids out into the world completely unprepared, deeply in debt, and unable to find employment.

No longer do youngsters seek adventure and live to tell the tale (at least not without someone getting arrested or taken away by CPS). Helicopter parenting and “higher education” are lowering the thresholds of common sense and, well, cajones. These coddled, wimpy kids could be the sensitive future leaders of our country, an alarming thought at best.

The course at Frostburg is a refreshing change from the tripe we’re seeing in the news from other colleges. I would much rather send my kids to a place where the headline is “University Teaches Survival Skills” than one that says “University Creates Safe Spaces for Word-Wounded Students.”

Here’s hoping that other schools follow their leads.

from:     http://www.zengardner.com/instead-providing-safe-spaces-university-teaches-survival-skills/

Are You Suffering from Soul Loss?

20 Diagnostic Signs That You’re Suffering From “Soul Loss”

soul loss4th February 2014

By Lissa Rankin MD

Guest Writer for Wake Up World

Our entire culture suffers from what the shamans call “soul loss,” a loss of meaning, direction, vitality, mission, purpose, identity, and genuine connection; a deep unhappiness that most of us have come to consider as simply ordinary. The soul is our source of absolute uniqueness, a place within that connects you not only to your own value and essence, but to the value and essence of every other living being. What makes soul loss so subtle and dangerous is that very few people have realized that it has happened. Most of us do not know that we have disconnected from our soul and have come to accept as normal a numbness and lack of meaning in our lives.

Because we all belong to this culture, we all suffer from soul loss. Soul loss is epidemic and blinds us from seeing the potential for joy and wholeness in ordinary life. When you heal from soul loss, you see familiar things in new ways so you can increase your joy in what you already have.

Not sure if you’re suffering from soul loss?

Here are 20 diagnostic signs that signal soul loss:

1. You feel like you’re not as good as other people.

2. You yearn to be of service, but you have no idea what you have to contribute and why it matters.

3. You find yourself striving in vain for an impossible-to-achieve standard of perfection.

4. Your fears keep you from living large.

5. You’re frequently worried that you’re not good enough, smart enough, thin enough, young enough, [fill in the blank] enough.

6. You feel like a victim of circumstances that are beyond your control.

7. You feel like your daily life is meaningless and task-driven.

8. You often feel helpless, hopeless, or pessimistic.

9. You protect your heart with steel walls.

10. You often feel you don’t really matter and your love doesn’t make a difference.

11. You’re always trying to fit in and belong, but you rarely feel like you do.

12. You feel beaten down by the challenges you face in your life.

13. You suffer from a variety of vague, hard to treat physical symptoms, such as fatigue, chronic pain, weight gain or loss, insomnia, skin disorders, or gastrointestinal symptoms.

14. You struggle with being able to accept love and nurturing.

15. You feel depressed, anxious, or chronically worried.

16. You feel like you’re not appreciated enough.

17. You find yourself often judging others.

18. You frequently numb yourself with alcohol, drugs, sex, television, or excessive busyness.

19. You feel disappointed with life.

20. You’ve forgotten how to dream.

How Soul Loss Shows Up At The Doctor’s Office

As a physician, I’ve had years of experience diagnosing soul loss in my patients, but Western medicine has no framework for this kind of diagnosis, and as doctors, we’re not taught to treat this kind of suffering, so we wind up mistreating it. What people suffering from soul loss need is the deep medicine of reconnection with the soul, but in our culture, we tend to treat soul loss too superficially.

We treat the chronic pain with pain medication. We treat the insomnia with sleeping pills. We treat the weight issues with diet and exercise. And most damagingly, we may label soul loss as mental illness, such as depression, and cover up the symptoms with psychiatric medications that may make things worse by slapping a Band-aid on a wound that’s not healing underneath the bandage.

The Treatment You Really Need

Sometimes the soul needs space in order to heal, and this may require the courage to make some external changes in your life. Perhaps you need to switch careers in order to give the soul more room to breathe. Perhaps an unhealthy relationship is constricting the soul, and it’s time to get into therapy, set boundaries, or even end things. Perhaps you need to find more people to love or relocate to a place that helps your soul come alive.  Perhaps you need to give your soul permission to engage in more creative activities. Such eternal changes may be part of the prescription the inner doctor of your soul writes.

But very often, those kinds of major life overhauls are NOT NECESSARY!  Reconnecting to the soul allows you to find peace and happiness right where you are in ways that are much simpler and more profound than you might think. It can be astounding to discover that you’ve had what you needed all along and have been looking in all the wrong places. Perhaps all that is needed is to see the life you’re already living in a different way.

10 Ways Your Soul Guides You In Daily Life

If you’re suffering from soul loss, what can you do about it? The first step to healing from soul loss is learning to reconnect to the guidance of your soul. In order to help you, Kitchen Table Wisdom author Rachel Naomi Remen and I are offering a free teleclass 10 Ways Your Soul Guides You In Daily Life. We’ll be teaching you one surprising vehicle the soul uses to speak to you loud and clear, how to interpret not only the green lights that affirm your path, but the red lights that redirect you, a way to ensure that the people you surround yourself with reflect back to you the voice of your soul and not the voice of your fear, a tool for interpreting how your soul speaks to you via the body, the one feeling that is always your soul talking, and more…

from:    http://wakeup-world.com/2014/02/04/20-diagnostic-signs-that-youre-suffering-from-soul-loss/