5G and Virus Outbreaks – A Consideration

Could 5G be Triggering the Spread of the Coronavirus?

In his landmark book on electricity and life, “The Invisible Rainbow,” Arthur Firstenberg, traces an eerie connection between the advent of four new technologies and major influenza epidemics in 1889, 1918, 1958 and 1968.

Spanish Flu 1918

The most notable connection is the famous Spanish Flu Epidemic of 1918, which killed more than 20 million people worldwide. This epidemic actually started on military bases in the US at about the same time the US military was rolling out a new form of wireless communications. Between 1917 and 1918, the US military built the world’s largest radio network. Meanwhile, the flu accelerated across military bases both stateside and overseas, and on ships equipped with the powerful wireless transmitters. As the troops and wireless equipment arrived in the European theatre during WWI, a sudden explosion of disease raced unabetted across Europe.

Wireless Impacts to the Earth’s Natural Electrical Field

As this influenza seemed to move too fast for historic disease models, dozens of scientists began to question the idea of a contagious virus. Testing was inconclusive as to whether the Spanish flu virus (H1N1) was actually being spread by germs, or something else. Firstenberg and others put forth the theory that wireless and other electrical fields may change the electrical nature of the earth’s atmosphere. The electrical core of the earth generates the earth’s electromagnetic field, which sends electromagnetic waves outward to the ionosphere, where they bounce back to earth and circumnavigate the globe. In its natural state, the earth emanates a 500 milligauss magnetic field at about 7.83 cycles per second. Yet, dramatic electrical changes to the earth’s atmosphere could disrupt the evolutionary balance of the electrical nature of the planet.

Could such an electrical shock to earth’s natural electrical field trigger dormant viruses in people and animals? After all, we are all electrical creatures. When we are healthy, 50 trillion cells in our bodies operate at around 70 millivolts. Could the new US military wireless signals, which had suddenly sprung up across the globe, have activated unnatural electrical activity in the already highly, electrically-charged ionosphere? And what effects could this have on our own body chemistry, which depends on a delicate electrical balance?

1889 Flu Epidemic

Firstenberg also connects the flu epidemic of 1889 with a new electrical innovation. This time it was the rapid expansion of the electrified railroad in the US. Until 1888, there were only 45 miles of electrified railroad in the US. Yet, in a single year, this network grew to over 1000 miles. These very low frequency waves can travel thousands of miles, bouncing off the ionosphere and virtually traveling around the world at the speed of light. That same year a vicious flu erupted virtually simultaneously in such far-flung places as Greenland, Uzbekistan and Northern Alberta. It then quickly appeared in even more disparate locations, such as Philadelphia, Australia and the Balkans. In the days of pre-air travel, it seemed impossible that a contagious disease could travel this fast to so many seemingly-unrelated geographies.

Flu becomes an Annual Phenomenon

By the end of 1889, the death toll had reached over one million worldwide.  Even more telling is that until then, influenza outbreaks had been a relatively rare occurrence. It had been nearly 30 years since the previous influenza outbreak in England. Firstenberg suggests that 1889 marked the beginning of influenza being an annual phenomenon for humans.

Missile Defense Systems and the Asian Flu of 1958

We now flash forward to 1958. In the heart of the Cold War, the US had just completed the build-out of the most powerful and extensive missile defense system the world had ever seen. Hundreds of high power radar stations which generated 1350 megahertz signals and included Doppler stations, operating at more than one kilowatt, were suddenly filling the heavens with unnatural levels of microwave radiation. The problem is that all these microwave signals bounce off the ionosphere and then come back to earth. The earth’s electrical envelope acts like a resonating chamber that traps all this electrical activity and propels it at light speed to all corners of the planet.

During the build-out the US triple-threat missile defense system, the Asian Flu was born in China. The death toll ultimately reached 4 million worldwide. Scientists associated this flu with the H2N2 virus, which was thought to be avian-related.

So, which is it? Is the flu caused by long dormant viruses, which are suddenly triggered by electrical disruptions in the atmosphere? Or, as it is generally believed, is the flu transmitted by viruses mainly found in birds, or poultry that somehow find their way into the human population?

Actually, both theories may be correct.

Immune System weakened from Wireless Radiation

In 2013, a Washington State University professor, Dr. Martin Pall published a landmark paper, “Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects.” This paper shows how electrical changes to ion channels can lead to biological chaos in the body, including the proliferation of free-radicals and excess calcium ions. Excess calcium ions (electrically charged elements) can be toxic. Typical symptoms include nausea, fatigue, muscle pain and fuzzy thinking. Sound a little like the flu? Meanwhile the proliferation of free-radicals creates inflammation, neurological impacts, and a compromised immune system.

If both Pall and Firstenberg are right, the rapid spread of the flu is much more than just the exposure to the underlying virus. While the virus is real, it may be both triggered and accelerated by changes in the electrical environment.  Such changes undermine our immune response to these viruses and we are unable to fight them off.

The 5G Connection

This brings us to 5G. For those who are unfamiliar with 5G, it is the fifth generation of wireless and cellular technologies. It uniquely uses intense clusters of wireless transmitters, which produce extremely high frequency signals and raise radiation exposures to humans exponentially. The frequency levels of this new technology can be many, many times higher than current wireless standards. Noted physicist Maxwell Planck showed that the level of energy in an electrical source is proportional to its frequency. Thus, 5G stands to impose significantly higher biological effects on humans than any previous technology.

Now, is it any coincidence that Wuhan, China, a leading “Smart City”, and one of the earliest adopters of 5G transmitters, is the very source of Covid-19 – the Coronavirus?

Well, if you are still doubting the connection between 5G and the Coronavirus, check out this overlay map* which locates major 5G installations in China and the major outbreaks of the Corona virus there.

Maybe Firstenberg’s claim of a connection between influenza and wireless technology is not so far-fetched after all.

The red and blue circles below represent 5G installations in China and North Korea. The light pink shows the regions marking the spread of Coronavirus. The map was created by an independent researcher overlaying a map of the 5G rollout in China with a map of the Covid-19 outbreak, both downloaded as of 2/26/20. Understand, this is a crude gauge using what information was publicly available on that date, and it is presented here only as a means to suggest that further serious research correlating Covid-19 incidence with locations of the 5G infrastructure should be undertaken.  If greater incidence of the Coronavirus is occurring in locations where 5G technologies have been deployed, this will be of critical public health importance.

 

See recent write up on 5G risks, including mention of the Covid-19 by Dr. Martin Pall here.

Professor Emeritus Martin Pall, February 25, 2020: Massive Predicted Effects of 5G in the Context of Safety Guideline Failures: Very High Level VGCC Sensitivity to Low Intensity EMFs and Especially to Pulsations

from:    https://manhattanneighbors.org/5g-corona/

Trackin’ Baby’s Poop

Huggies Now Selling Smart Diapers With Bluetooth Sensors Even Though Radiation Exposure From Them Isn’t Safe for Babies

By B.N. Frank

The idea of “Smart Diapers” for babies dates back a few years.   As noted in a recent Vox article, Huggies is now selling them in Korea and Japan and the U.S. and Mexico may be getting them next.

More companies are interested in creating and marketing these diapers as well as other “Smart” personal care products.  Besides being expensive, Bluetooth technology emits harmful wireless radiation and there is currently no safe level of wireless radiation exposure that has been determined for children or pregnant women.  In fact, 250 scientists have signed a petition which warns against numerous devices that emit Radio Frequency (RF) Radiation, which is used in WiFi and Bluetooth.

“Smart” Diapers also qualify as another source of “Surveillance Capitalism” since companies freely admit that they are able to gather data and track their customer use from the diaper sensors.

Regardless, companies are hoping that there is much money to be made especially since “Smart Diapers” for adults seems to already be a thriving market.  Poor grandma and grandpa…

That long march toward making smart diapers happen has been driven more by fears of slipping market shares than by any kind of real demand from consumers. The furious pace of innovation belies the fact that the US diaper market is in trouble. As the birthrate declines for the seventh year in a row, there are fewer and fewer new parents to buy diapers, and almost all major diaper brands have taken hits. After Kimberly-Clark, which manufactures Huggies, laid off 13 percent of its workers in January 2018, the CEO told investors, “You can’t encourage moms to use more diapers in a developed market where the babies aren’t being born in those markets.”

Last summer, to counter wilting sales, Pampers raised the price of its signature diaper by 4 percent. Huggies is making a bet different bet: By selling upscale diapers, it hopes to recoup the profits lost to a rapidly shrinking baby diaper market.

“The fact that the birthrates are quite low in the US has stirred a lot of interest in trying to get the consumer to spend more,” said Ali Dibadj, who tracks the personal products industry for the investment management group Sanford C. Bernstein. “The only way they can increase their business is to bring better products to the market. Their whole hope is to create products that the consumer base will pay more for.”

That puts Huggies squarely in line with other companies advocating seemingly unnecessary tech infusions into ordinary hygiene products on the bet that it will widen their profit margins. The brands behind the major US diapers have already flooded the market with “smart” toothbrushes, razors, and skin care wands, all of which they hope will entice wealthier consumers who can be convinced to drop the extra money.

Later this year, Procter & Gamble, which manufactures Pampers, is launching an AI toothbrush that claims to improve brushing. While typical electric toothbrushes cost around $30, P&G is planning to start its AI brush at $279, a massive price jump that foreshadows the future of the smart diaper. Kimberly-Clark, for its part, promised more “meaningful innovation” of its personal hygiene products, although the company already boasts everything from smart toilet paper to smart restrooms equipped with sensors that relay data about soap and toilet paper use.

[…]

There is not a lot to a smart diaper — the removable Bluetooth sensor, which resembles an orange disk, can be attached to the outside of any regular diaper. That sensor syncs to a Huggies smartphone app, where it relays information about the temperature and air quality, and — in addition to individual alerts about baby poop or pee — tracks the overall frequency of a baby’s bowel movements and calculates the times of day the diaper tends to need changing. No more than five people can register as guardians on the app. (Source: Vox)

Justification for purchasing this product is offered by Tony Park who developed the Bluetooth sensor used in Huggies’ smart diapers:

Park told Vox that the design is personal for him. Some babies, like his daughter, don’t cry when their diapers need changing, and figuring out when to switch diapers before a rash develops is a challenging guessing game. His target customers are millennial first-time parents who don’t have the time to constantly check diapers. “They are quite busy working two jobs,” he said. “They want to get involved in parenting, but they don’t have enough time to share with their baby. With our Monit device, they can get a notification whenever and wherever.”

Oh Tony.  Just because you can – doesn’t mean you should.

from:    https://www.activistpost.com/2019/05/huggies-smart-diapers-bluetooth-sensors-radiation-exposure.html