What’s in that Smell?

The Charms And Harms Of Air Fresheners

By Catherine J. Frompovich

Are you aware that “secondhand scents” or indirect exposure to room air fresheners raise parallel concerns to “secondhand tobacco smoke”?  Professor Anne Steinemann of the University of Melbourne in Australia [1] submits that connection.

Professor Steinemann, whose work I have followed for a few years, recently emailed me a list of some of her recent papers published regarding research on chemical exposures, fragranced consumer products, and health effects, which I’d like to introduce my readers to because your lungs and immune systems are under constant chemical vapor attack from scents you can control and those you cannot, e.g., a coworker’s obnoxious perfume or aftershave cologne, aerial sprays, manufacturing emissions, exhaust fumes, etc.

Scented dryer sheets, which impregnate bedding and clothing, are serious, heavy duty scents that can precipitate asthma attacks, bronchitis, allergic reactions, and/or exacerbate COPD problems.  Many scents and scented products contain formaldehyde, a probable human carcinogen [2].

Why do I want to introduce the matter of scents and scented products?  The prime reason is because we are being assaulted from on high with chemtrails spraying, which contain any number of chemical products and other ‘things’ that fall to earth and float in the air we are forced to breathe.  Lung cancer is on the rise in non-smokers!  According to MedPageToday,

Never-smokers accounted for 13% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases at the beginning of the study period and rose steadily to 28% by November 2014. … The reasons for the increasein nonsmokers among patients with NSCLC remain unclear.

Rates in U.S. and U.K. doubled since 2008 without obvious clues.

There are clues, in my opinion, which are in plain sight, i.e., all those scented products available, plus our noses, bronchi and lungs also ‘tell’ us something smells chemically!  Some chronic respiratory diseases which are on the rise include:

  • Asthma
  • Bronchiectasis
  • Chronic obstructive lung disease, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchitis and emphysema
  • Chronic rhinosinusitis
  • Hypersensitivity pneumonitis
  • Lung cancers and neoplasms of respiratory and intrathoracic organs
  • Lung fibrosis

Dr. Steinemann states as a conclusion in her open access article “Ten questions concerning air fresheners and indoor built environments,” published at Elsevier Building and Environment, Vol. 111, January 2017, Pages 279-284,

[A]ir fresheners are used throughout society, often with the intent to create a favorable indoor environment.  However, air fresheners may come with unintended and perhaps invisible risks.  This article looked at the science, health and policy dimensions of air fresheners, and offered research findings and directions on ways to improve the air quality indoors and reduce potential exposures to pollutants.

Some of Dr. Steinemann’s open source articles, which may help readers to understand the problems associated with scented product use include:

Effects of fragranced products on asthmatics in the USA: 64.3% of asthmatics report adverse health effects from exposure to fragranced products such as air fresheners and cleaning supplies    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11869-017-0536-2

Prevalence of multiple chemical sensitivities United States: 25.9% of the general population report chemical sensitivity, and 6.5% report medically diagnosed MCS, representing an increase of more than 200% and 300%, respectively, in the past decade
https://journals.lww.com/joem/Fulltext/2018/03000/National_Prevalence_and_Effects_of_Multiple.17.aspx

Fragranced consumer products and health effects in America: 34.7% report adverse health effects  https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11869-016-0442-z

Air fresheners and indoor air quality: why air fresheners impair rather than improve air quality
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0360132316304334

Regarding the above mix, consumers need to study, and factor in, an unseen quantifier that adversely impacts all bodily systems—but especially the skin and sweat glands.  It’s electromagnetic frequencies from Wi-Fi, cell phones and towers, and more specifically 5G, the next upgrade in faster speeds for computers, iPhones, computer games, etc.  The video below explains some of the skin problems attributed to 5G.

5G Technology: Potential Risks to Human Health
10:39 minutes

https://youtu.be/QvPg1AyQ43I?t=28

Since the human body is about 60% water [3], we need to look more closely at how all that’s going on in the world of chemicals, pharmaceuticals, agriculture and technology advances will impact—and are impacting—humans’ ability to maintain optimal health.

Become conscious of the chemicals in the products you buy for your home, especially scented products, bug sprays and lawn chemicals.  You can check for harmful ingredients at http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/.

References:

[1] https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/tobacco-smoke
[2] https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/substances/formaldehyde/formaldehyde-fact-sheet
[3] https://water.usgs.gov/edu/propertyyou.html

Catherine J Frompovich (website) is a retired natural nutritionist who earned advanced degrees in Nutrition and Holistic Health Sciences, Certification in Orthomolecular Theory and Practice plus Paralegal Studies. Her work has been published in national and airline magazines since the early 1980s. Catherine authored numerous books on health issues along with co-authoring papers and monographs with physicians, nurses, and holistic healthcare professionals. She has been a consumer healthcare researcher 35 years and counting.

Catherine’s latest book, published October 4, 2013, is Vaccination Voodoo, What YOU Don’t Know About Vaccines, available on Amazon.com.

Her 2012 book A Cancer Answer, Holistic BREAST Cancer Management, A Guide to Effective & Non-Toxic Treatments, is available on Amazon.com and as a Kindle eBook.

Two of Catherine’s more recent books on Amazon.com are Our Chemical Lives And The Hijacking Of Our DNA, A Probe Into What’s Probably Making Us Sick (2009) and Lord, How Can I Make It Through Grieving My Loss, An Inspirational Guide Through the Grieving Process (2008)

Catherine’s NEW book: Eat To Beat Disease, Foods Medicinal Qualities ©2016 Catherine J Frompovich is now available.

from:    https://www.activistpost.com/2018/07/the-charms-and-harms-of-air-fresheners.html

Allergy Epidemic Link to Antibacterial Products

Rise in Allergies Linked to War on Bacteria

By Diana Gitig, Ars Technica

“Allergic diseases have reached pandemic levels,” begins David Artis’s new paper in Nature Medicine. Artis goes on to say that, while everyone knows allergies are caused by a combination of factors involving both nature and nurture, that knowledge doesn’t help us identify what is culpable — it is not at all clear exactly what is involved, or how the relevant players promote allergic responses.

 

There is some evidence that one of the causes lies within our guts. Epidemiological studies have linked changes in the species present in commensal bacteria — the trillions of microorganisms that reside in our colon — to the development of allergic diseases. (Typically, somewhere between 1,000 and 15,000 different bacterial species inhabit our guts.) And immunologists know that signaling molecules produced by some immune cells mediate allergic inflammation. Animal studies have provided the link between these two, showing that commensal bacteria promote allergic inflammation. But these researchers wanted to know more about how.

To figure it out, Artis and his colleagues at Penn’s School of Veterinary Medicine treated mice with a broad range of oral antibiotics to diminish or deplete their commensal bacteria and then examined different immunological parameters. They used a combination of five different antibiotics, ranging from ampicillin, which is fairly run of the mill, to vancomycin, which is kind of a nasty one.

They found that mice treated with antibiotics had elevated levels of antibodies known to be important in allergies and asthma (IgE class antibodies). The elevated antibodies in turn increased the levels of basophils, immune cells that play a role in inflammation, both allergic and otherwise.

This connection doesn’t only apply to mice but also to humans who have high levels of IgE for genetic reasons. People with genetically elevated levels of IgE are hypersusceptible to eczema and infections, and antibodies that neutralize IgE are used to treat asthma.

The antibiotic treatments and IgE did not act by promoting the survival of mature basophils, but rather by promoting the proliferation of basophil precursor cells in the bone marrow. Commensal bacteria limit this proliferative capacity.

That discovery is the real insight contributed by this paper. It has been well known for some time that IgE mediates allergies. But no one knew that bacteria living in the gut may use it to check the growth of immune precursor cells in the bone marrow. The finding might have wide-ranging implications and help us make sense of other chronic inflammatory disease states that have also been associated with changes in this bacterial populations. Commensal bacteria might impact these other inflammatory conditions — including cancer, infection, and autoimmune disorders — through this mechanism, as well.

Experts have puzzled over the enormous explosion of asthma and allergies in recent years, and been unable to pinpoint the cause. This paper suggests that perhaps the overuse of antibacterial products could be to blame.

Image: Janice Haney Carr/CDC

Citation: “Commensal bacteria–derived signals regulate basophil hematopoiesis and allergic inflammation.” David A Hill, Mark C Siracusa, Michael C Abt, Brian S Kim, Dmytro Kobuley, Masato Kubo, Taku Kambayashi, David F LaRosa, Ellen D Renner, Jordan S Orange, Frederic D Bushman and David Artis. Nature Medicine, published online March 25, 2012. DOI: 10.1038/nm.2657  

from:   http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/03/allergic-bacteria-disease/?intcid=story_ribbon