Consciousness & A Link to Light

CONSCIOUSNESS, BIOPHOTONS, AND MULTIVERSES

Every now and then I get one of “those” articles that’s so stunning in its implications that I have to blog about it, if simply for the sheer fun of crawling out to the end of the High Octane Speculation twig, and launching myself into thin air and just let the speculations run where they will. Well, this article that was spotted and shared by Mr. V.T. is definitely one of “those” articles:

Scientists Discover Biophotons In The Brain That Could Hint Our Consciousness Is Directly Linked To Light

What grabbed me here was this:

Scientists found that neurons in mammalian brains were capable of producing photons of light, or “Biophotons”!

The photons, strangely enough, appear within the visible spectrum. They range from near-infrared through violet, or between 200 and 1,300 nanometers.

Scientists have an exciting suspicion that our brain’s neurons might be able to communicate through light. They suspect that our brain might have optical communication channels, but they have no idea what could be communicated.

And that led the author or authors of the article to ask an obvious question:

This raises the question, could it be possible that the more light one can produce and communicate between neurons, the more conscious they are?

In other words, in contrast to the “older” model of consciousness being a kind of “either/or” question, with humans obviously “conscious” and rocks obviously not, and animals in some frustrating philosophical no-man’s land in between (“dumb animals”), might it be more of a spectrum or continuum? Well, maybe. Personally, I’ve always been more comfortable with the latter view than the former, and I suspect that anyone who has owned a pet is too; they certainly don’t behave or act as simply “dumb biomechanical machines.”

However, there’s a catch in the article, and it’s revealed by that very “continuum of consciousness” idea: do more biophotons and neurons not indicate a materialist view of the mind, i.e., that mind and consciousness arise solely from materialistic causes? It may seem that way, but the author/s of the article are quick to catch the implications of the finding, which, when one thinks about it a bit, flips the whole argument of emergent consciousness from material causes on its head:

Just think for a moment. Many texts and religions dating way back, since the dawn of human civilization have reported of saints, ascended beings and enlightened individuals having shining circles around their heads.

From Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, to teachings of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam and Christianity, among many other religions, sacred individuals were depicted with a shining circle in the form of a circular glow around their heads.

In other words, that famous verse from Genesis that many of us learned in Sunday school – “Let there be light” – might be a kind of biophysical euphemism for “Let there be conscious existence.” But they don’t stop there:

But one of the most exciting implications the discovery that our brains can produce light gives, is that maybe our consciousness and spirit are not contained within our bodies. This implication is completely overlooked by scientists.

Quantum entanglement says that 2 entangled photons react if one of the photons is affected no matter where the other photon is in The Universe without any delay.

In other words, the patterns of biophotonic activity, if they do give rise to consciousness, means precisely that that a specific pattern could be entangled somewhere else in the universe, and hence, that specific consciousness is not localized within “this particular brain” but could, in fact, be localized in several brains. That really captured my imagination, for it seems to square with many other hypotheses, from Dr. Rupter Sheldrake’s “morphogenetic field” to the idea – voiced by Bearden and some other authors – that each species has its own unique “electromagnetic signature”, which signature again is a non-local phenomenon; even the idea of epigenetics seems to be implied by the idea, i.e., that there is some mechanism influencing evolution that is beyond the sum total of material “bits of information” (the genome itself), influencing development.

It’s that possibility of the entanglement of biophotons that could also impact on something else: the multi-verse theory of Everett and Wheeler, who first posited that interpretation of quantum mechanics. The idea is, that for every set of possible observations, there must be a “timeline” or “universe” actualizing that potential (to put it crudely). They were, it should be noted, very uncomfortable with their own idea, because it seemed to make no sense. Plus, it gave rise to all sorts of thorny problems: if there were a multitude of universes, was it possible for one to “bleed through” into the other? Conventional wisdom would say no. But if those multiverses are a reflection of “entangled biophotons,” something very different would seem to result, for the first result is: the template of an individual consciousness itself might be non-local, but it is found present simultaneously in a multitude of “universes” (or if one prefer, timelines), and it’s that which might account for “bleed through” or “overlap” of one into the other. If all this high octane speculation be true, then a great deal will have to be re-thought, from reincarnation to multiverses, for it would appear that this idea of an entangled, non-local template of consciousness would be, more or less, a common surface uniting them all.

See you on the flip side..

from:    https://gizadeathstar.com/2019/01/consciousness-biophotons-and-multiverses/

Showing “Spooky Action at a Distance”

Proving Einstein Wrong with ‘Spooky’ Quantum Experiment

Time & Quantum Entanglement

Time Is A Side Effect Of Quantum Entanglement

| January 8, 2015

Time Is A Side Effect Of Quantum Entanglement

by Physics Arxiv

Time is an emergent phenomenon that is a side effect of quantum entanglement, say physicists. And they have the first experimental results to prove it

When the new ideas of quantum mechanics spread through science like wildfire in the first half of the 20th century, one of the first things physicists did was to apply them to gravity and general relativity. The results were not pretty.

It immediately became clear that these two foundations of modern physics were entirely incompatible. When physicists attempted to meld the approaches, the resulting equations were bedeviled with infinities making it impossible to make sense of the results.

Then in the mid-1960s, there was a breakthrough. The physicists John Wheeler and Bryce DeWitt successfully combined the previously incompatible ideas in a key result that has since become known as the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. This is important because it avoids the troublesome infinites—a huge advance.

But it didn’t take physicists long to realise that while the Wheeler-DeWitt equation solved one significant problem, it introduced another. The new problem was that time played no role in this equation. In effect, it says that nothing ever happens in the universe, a prediction that is clearly at odds with the observational evidence.

This conundrum, which physicists call ‘the problem of time’, has proved to be a thorn in flesh of modern physicists, who have tried to ignore it but with little success.

Then in 1983, the theorists Don Page and William Wootters came up with a novel solution based on the quantum phenomenon of entanglement. This is the exotic property in which two quantum particles share the same existence, even though they are physically separated.

Entanglement is a deep and powerful link and Page and Wootters showed how it can be used to measure time. Their idea was that the way a pair of entangled particles evolve is a kind of clock that can be used to measure change.

But the results depend on how the observation is made. One way to do this is to compare the change in the entangled particles with an external clock that is entirely independent of the universe. This is equivalent to god-like observer outside the universe measuring the evolution of the particles using an external clock.

In this case, Page and Wootters showed that the particles would appear entirely unchanging—that time would not exist in this scenario.

But there is another way to do it that gives a different result. This is for an observer inside the universe to compare the evolution of the particles with the rest of the universe. In this case, the internal observer would see a change and this difference in the evolution of entangled particles compared with everything else is an important a measure of time.

This is an elegant and powerful idea. It suggests that time is an emergent phenomenon that comes about because of the nature of entanglement. And it exists only for observers inside the universe. Any god-like observer outside sees a static, unchanging universe, just as the Wheeler-DeWitt equations predict.

Of course, without experimental verification, Page and Wootter’s ideas are little more than a philosophical curiosity. And since it is never possible to have an observer outside the universe, there seemed little chance of ever testing the idea.

Until now. Today, Ekaterina Moreva at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM) in Turin, Italy, and a few pals have performed the first experimental test of Page and Wootters’ ideas. And they confirm that time is indeed an emergent phenomenon for ‘internal’ observers but absent for external ones.

The experiment involves the creation of a toy universe consisting of a pair of entangled photons and an observer that can measure their state in one of two ways. In the first, the observer measures the evolution of the system by becoming entangled with it. In the second, a god-like observer measures the evolution against an external clock which is entirely independent of the toy universe.

The experimental details are straightforward. The entangled photons each have a polarization which can be changed by passing it through a birefringent plate. In the first set up, the observer measures the polarization of one photon, thereby becoming entangled with it. He or she then compares this with the polarization of the second photon. The difference is a measure of time.

In the second set up, the photons again both pass through the birefringent plates which change their polarizations. However, in this case, the observer only measures the global properties of both photons by comparing them against an independent clock.

In this case, the observer cannot detect any difference between the photons without becoming entangled with one or the other. And if there is no difference, the system appears static. In other words, time does not emerge.

“Although extremely simple, our model captures the two, seemingly contradictory, properties of the Page-Wootters mechanism,” say Moreva and co.

That’s an impressive experiment. Emergence is a popular idea in science. In particular, physicists have recently become excited about the idea that gravity is an emergent phenomenon. So it’s a relatively small step to think that time may emerge in a similar way.

What emergent gravity has lacked, of course, is an experimental demonstration that shows how it works in practice. That’s why Moreva and co’s work is significant. It places an abstract and exotic idea on firm experimental footing for the first time.

Perhaps most significant of all is the implication that quantum mechanics and general relativity are not so incompatible after all. When viewed through the lens of entanglement, the famous ‘problem of time’ just melts away.

The next step will be to extend the idea further, particularly to the macroscopic scale. It’s one thing to show how time emerges for photons, it’s quite another to show how it emerges for larger things such as humans and train timetables.

And therein lies another challenge.

from:    http://www.bodymindsoulspirit.com/time-is-a-side-effect-of-quantum-entanglement/

Time and Entanglement

 

Physics team entangles photons that never coexisted in time

May 28, 2013 by Bob Yirka report
Physics team entangles photons that never coexisted in time
Time line diagram. (I) Birth of photons 1 and 2, (II) detection of photon 1, (III) birth of photons 3 and 4, (IV) Bell projection of photons 2 and 3, (V) detection of photon 4. Credit: Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 210403 (2013) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.210403
(Phys.org) —Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have succeeded in causing entanglement swapping between photons that never coexisted in time. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team explains how their experiment proves true an entanglement phenomenon first described by researchers last year at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.

The idea seems not just counterintuitive, but impossible—that could be entangled that never existed at the same time—but that’s just what the team in Germany, led by Joachim von Zanthier, suggested. In this new effort, the team in Israel, led by Hagai Eisenberg, has proven it’s possible by actually doing it.

is, of course, where the quantum states of two particles are linked—what happens to one happens to the other regardless of the distance between them. This new work shows that they can be linked via time as well.

To prove it, the researchers first used a laser to cause entanglement between a pair of photons, P1, P2. They then measured the of P1, which was immediately followed by the entangling of another pair of photons, P3, P4. This was followed by measuring P2 and P3 simultaneously and causing them to become entangled with one another—a process known as projective measurement. Then, P4 was measured. Measuring P1 caused its demise of course—before P4 was born—but the measurement of P4 showed that it had become entangled with P1 nevertheless, if only for a very short period of time.

The researchers suggest that the outcome of their experiment shows that entanglement is not a truly physical property, at least not in a tangible sense. To say that two photons are entangled, they write, doesn’t mean they have to exist at the same time. It shows that quantum events don’t always have a parallel in the observable world.

Being able to entangle particles that don’t exist at the same time opens up the door to new for building ultra-secure networks—communications could occur between physical locations, for example, that never actually sent an encrypted key directly to one another. It could also perhaps lead to new developments by researchers hoping to create a true quantum computer.

More information: Entanglement Swapping between Photons that have Never Coexisted, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 210403 (2013) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.210403

Abstract
The role of the timing and order of quantum measurements is not just a fundamental question of quantum mechanics, but also a puzzling one. Any part of a quantum system that has finished evolving can be measured immediately or saved for later, without affecting the final results, regardless of the continued evolution of the rest of the system. In addition, the nonlocality of quantum mechanics, as manifested by entanglement, does not apply only to particles with spacelike separation, but also to particles with timelike separation. In order to demonstrate these principles, we generated and fully characterized an entangled pair of photons that have never coexisted. Using entanglement swapping between two temporally separated photon pairs, we entangle one photon from the first pair with another photon from the second pair. The first photon was detected even before the other was created. The observed two-photon state demonstrates that entanglement can be shared between timelike separated quantum systems.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-05-physics-team-entangles-photons-coexisted.html#jCp

New Discoveries on the Nature of Light

Quantum Mystery of Light Revealed by New Experiment

Clara Moskowitz, LiveScience senior writer
Date: 05 November 2012
Light's Wave-Particle Duality
This illustration shows the dual nature of light, which acts like both particles and waves. In a new experiment reported in November 2012, researchers observed light photons acting like both particles and waves simultaneously.
CREDIT: S. Tanzilli, CNRS

Is light made of waves, or particles?

This fundamental question has dogged scientists for decades, because light seems to be both. However, until now, experiments have revealed light to act either like a particle, or a wave, but never the two at once.

Now, for the first time, a new type of experiment has shown light behaving like both a particle and a wave simultaneously, providing a new dimension to the quandary that could help reveal the true nature of light, and of the whole quantum world.

The debate goes back at least as far as Isaac Newton, who advocated that light was made of particles, and James Clerk Maxwell, whose successful theory of electromagnetism, unifying the forces of electricity and magnetism into one, relied on a model of light as a wave. Then in 1905, Albert Einstein explained a phenomenon called the photoelectric effect using the idea that light was made of particles called photons (this discovery won him the Nobel Prize in physics). [What’s That? Your Physics Questions Answered]

Ultimately, there’s good reason to think that light is both a particle and a wave. In fact, the same seems to be true of all subatomic particles, including electrons and quarks and even the recently discovered Higgs boson-like particle. The idea is called wave-particle duality, and is a fundamental tenet of the theory of quantum mechanics.

Depending on which type of experiment is used, light, or any other type of particle, will behave like a particle or like a wave. So far, both aspects of light’s nature haven’t been observed at the same time.

But still, scientists have wondered, does light switch from being a particle to being a wave depending on the circumstance? Or is light always both a particle and a wave simultaneously?

Artist’s impression, inspired by the work of the artist Maurits Cornelis Escher, of the continuous  morphing between particle- and wave-like behaviour of light
Artist’s impression, inspired by the work of the artist Maurits Cornelis Escher, of the continuous morphing between particle- and wave-like behaviour of light
CREDIT: Nicolas Brunner and Jamie Simmonds

Now, for the first time, researchers have devised a new type of measurement apparatus that can detect both particle and wave-like behavior at the same time. The device relies on a strange quantum effect called quantum nonlocality, a counter-intuitive notion that boils down to the idea that the same particle can exist in two locations at once.

“The measurement apparatus detected strong nonlocality, which certified that the photon behaved simultaneously as a wave and a particle in our experiment,” physicist Alberto Peruzzo of England’s University of Bristol said in a statement. “This represents a strong refutation of models in which the photon is either a wave or a particle.”

Peruzzo is lead author of a paper describing the experiment published in the Nov. 2 issue of the journal Science.

 

The experiment further relies on another weird aspect of quantum mechanics — the idea of quantum entanglement. Two particles can become entangled so that actions performed on one particle affect the other. In this way, the researchers were able to allow the photons in the experiment to delay the choice of whether to be particles or waves.

MIT physicist Seth Lloyd, who was not involved in the project, called the experiment “audacious” in a related essay in Science, and said that while it allowed the photons to delay the choice of being particles or waves for only a few nanoseconds, “if one has access to quantum memory in which to store the entanglement, the decision could be put off until tomorrow (or for as long as the memory works reliably). So why decide now? Just let those quanta slide!”

from:    http://www.livescience.com/24509-light-wave-particle-duality-experiment.html

Is Our Universe a Hologram?

Do We Live In A Holographic Universe?

By DailyGalaxy.com

What if our existence is a holographic projection of another, flat version of you living on a two-dimensional “surface” at the edge of this universe? In other words, are we real, or are we quantum interactions on the edges of the universe – and is that just as real anyway?

Whether we actually live in a hologram is being hotly debated, but it is now becoming clear that looking at phenomena through a holographic lens could be key to solving some of the most perplexing problems in physics, including the physics that reigned before the big bang, what gives particles mass, a theory of quantum gravity.

In 1982 a little known but epic event occured at the University of Paris, where a research team led by physicist Alain Aspect performed what may turn out to be one of the most important experiments of the 20th century. You did not hear about it on the Daily Show. In fact, unless you are a physicist you probably have never even heard Aspect’s name, though increasing numbers of experts believe his discovery may change the face of science.

Aspect and his team discovered that under certain circumstances subatomic particles such as electrons are able to instantaneously communicate with each other regardless of the distance separating them. It doesn’t matter whether they are 10 feet or 10 billion miles apart.

Somehow each particle always seems to know what the other is doing. The problem with this feat is that it violates Einstein’s long-held tenet that no communication can travel faster than the speed of light. Since traveling faster than the speed of light is tantamount to breaking the time barrier, this daunting prospect has caused some physicists to try to come up with increasingly elaborate ways to explain away Aspect’s findings.

University of London physicist David Bohm, for example, believes Aspect’s findings imply that objective reality does not exist, that despite its apparent solidity the universe is at heart a phantasm, a gigantic and splendidly detailed hologram. Bohm was involved in the early development of the holonomic model of the functioning of the brain, a model for human cognition that is drastically different from conventionally accepted ideas. Bohm developed the theory that the brain operates in a manner similar to a hologram, in accordance with quantum mathematical principles and the characteristics of wave patterns.

To understand why Bohm makes this startling assertion, one must first understand that a hologram is a three- dimensional photograph made with the aid of a laser. To make a hologram, the object to be photographed is first bathed in the light of a laser beam. Then a second laser beam is bounced off the reflected light of the first and the resulting interference pattern (the area where the two laser beams conflate) is captured on film. When the film is developed, it looks like a meaningless swirl of light and dark lines. But as soon as the developed film is illuminated by another laser beam, a three-dimensional image of the original object appears.

In a recent collaboration between Fermilab scientists and hundreds of meters of laser may have found the very pixels of reality, grains of spacetime one tenth of a femtometer across.

The GEO600 system is armed with six hundred meters of laser tube, which sounds like enough to equip an entire Star War, but these lasers are for detection, not destruction. GEO600′s length means it can measure changes of one part in six hundred million, accurate enough to detect even the tiniest ripples in space time – assuming it isn’t thrown off by somebody sneezing within a hundred meters or the wrong types of cloud overhead (seriously). The problem with such an incredibly sensitive device is just that – it’s incredibly sensitive.

The interferometer staff constantly battle against unwanted aberration, and were struggling against a particularly persistent signal when Fermilab Professor Craig Hogan suggested the problem wasn’t with their equipment but with reality itself. The quantum limit of reality, the Planck length, occurs at a far smaller length scale than their signal – but according to Hogan, this literal ultimate limit of tininess might be scaled up because we’re all holograms. Obviously.

The idea is that all of our spatial dimensions can be represented by a ‘surface’ with one less dimension, just like a 3D hologram can be built out of information in 2D foils. The foils in our case are the edges of the observable universe, where quantum fluctuations at the Planck scale are ‘scaled up’ into the ripples observed by the GEO600 team. We’d like to remind you that although we’re talking about “The GEO600 Laser Team probing the edge of reality”, this is not a movie.

What does this mean for you? In everyday action, nothing much – we’re afraid that a fundamentally holographic nature doesn’t allow you to travel around playing guitar and fighting crime (no matter what 80s cartoons may have taught you.) Whether reality is as you see it, or you’re the representation of interactions on a surface at the edge of the universe, getting run over by a truck (or a representation thereof) will still kill you.

In intellectual terms, though, this should raise so many fascinating questions you’ll never need TV again. While in the extreme earliest stages, with far more work to go before anyone can draw any conclusions, this is some of the most mind-bending metaphysical science you’ll ever see

http://wakeup-world.com/2011/10/17/do-we-live-in-a-holographic-universe/

Kingsley Dennis on Quantum Consciousness

Quantum Consciousness, the Way to Reconcile Science & Spirituality

by KINGSLEY DENNIS on JULY 12, 2010

Human thought in the 21st century needs to work towards a new model that immerses the human being within a vibrant energetic universe. However, this need not demand that we throw away what we already have; rather, we can expand upon the tools that have brought us to our present position. There is an eastern proverb that roughly translates as: ‘You may ride your donkey up to your front door, but would you ride it into your house?’ In other words, when we have arrived at a particular destination we are often required to make a transition in order to continue the journey. In this sense we can be grateful to a vast knowledge base of scientific and religious thought for helping us to arrive at where we presently stand. Yet it is now imperative that we move forward. As Deepak Chopra suggested in his opening contribution to this Forum, how we move forward is likely to be centered in our understanding of consciousness.

Our physical apparatus is spectacular; consider that each of us carries around a 100 billion-cell bioelectric quantum computer that creates our realities, with almost all of its neurons established the day we were born. Still, this phenomenal ‘reality shaper’ has undergone monumental perceptual change over our evolutionary history. What is required, at this significant juncture, is again another catalyst of consciousness change. This may come about through discoveries in the field of quantum biology, and the idea, emphasized by Ervin Laszlo in his previous blogs, that the form of consciousness we possess is likely to be the result ofquantum coherence.

The human body is a constant flux of thousands of inter-reactions and processes connecting molecules, cells, organs, fluids, throughout the brain, body and nervous system. Up until recently it was thought that all these countless interactions operated in a linear sequence, passing on information much like a runner passing the baton to the next runner. However, the latest findings in quantum biology and biophysics have discovered that there is in fact a tremendous degree of coherence within all living systems. It has been found through extensive scientific investigation that a form of quantum coherence operates within living biological systems through what is known as biological excitations and biophoton emission. What this means is that metabolic energy is stored as a form of electromechanical and electromagnetic excitations. It is these coherent excitations that are considered responsible for generating and maintaining long-range order via the transformation of energy and very weak electromagnetic signals.

After nearly twenty years of experimental research, Fritz-Albert Popp put forward the hypothesis that biophotons are emitted from a coherent electrodynamic field within the living system. What this effectively means is that each living cell is giving off, and resonating with, a biophoton field of coherent energy. If each cell is emitting this field then the whole living system is, in effect, a resonating field—a ubiquitous non-local field. And since it is by the means of biophotons that the living system communicates, then there is near instantaneous intercommunication throughout. And this, claims Popp, is the basis for coherent biological organization—referred to as quantum coherence.

Biophysicist Mae Wan Ho has described how the living organism, including the human body, is “coherent beyond our wildest dreams” in that our bodies are constituted by a form of liquid crystal, which is an ideal transmitter of communication, resonance, and coherence. All living biological organisms continuously emit radiations of light that form a field of coherence and communication.

Moreover, biophysicists have discovered that living organisms are permeated by quantum wave forms. Ho informs us that,

…the visible body just happens to be where the wave function of the organism is most dense. Invisible quantum waves are spreading out from each of us and permeating into all other organisms. At the same time, each of us has the waves of every other organism entangled within our own make-up… (Ho, Mae-Wan, (1998) The Rainbow and the Worm: The Physics of Organisms. Singapore: World Scientific)

This incredible new discovery actually positions each living being within a non-local quantum field consisting of wave interferences (where bodies meet). Each person is thus not only in an emphatic relationship with each other but is also entangled with one another.

Neuroscience, quantum biology, and quantum physics are now beginning to converge to reveal that our bodies are not only biochemical systems but also sophisticated resonating quantum systems. These new discoveries show that a form of nonlocal connected consciousness has a physical-scientific basis. Further, it demonstrates that certain spiritual or transcendental states of collective Oneness have a valid basis within the new scientific paradigm.

If we are willing to step down from the donkey we will find that our new path ahead has a place for reconciling science and spirituality. We should focus on the best of both worlds: engage in cooperation, not in conflict and competition.

from:    http://ervinlaszlo.com/forum/2010/07/12/quantum-consciousness-the-way-to-reconcile-science-spirituality/