11/25 Solar Eclipse

2011’s Last Solar Eclipse Shows Off for Southern Hemisphere

Stephanie Pappas, LiveScience Senior Writer
Date: 24 November 2011 Time: 11:14 AM ET
Photographer and skywatcher Bernt Olsen snapped this view of the partial solar eclipse of June 1-2, 2011 just during the "midnight sun" in Tromso, Norway. The partial solar eclipse was dubbed a "midnight" eclipse as its viewing path crossed the Internatio
Photographer and skywatcher Bernt Olsen snapped this view of the partial solar eclipse of June 1-2, 2011 just during the “midnight sun” in Tromso, Norway. The partial solar eclipse was dubbed a “midnight” eclipse as its viewing path crossed the International Date Line across far northern latitudes.
CREDIT: Bernt Olsen

The last solar eclipse of 2011 will put on a show for some in the Southern Hemisphere on Friday (Nov. 25), but Americans shouldn’t bother to look up from their Thanksgiving leftovers.

According to NASA, viewers in South Africa, Antarctica, Tasmania and most of NewZealand will see the partial eclipse at 06:20:17 Universal time (1:20 a.m. Eastern time). With a magnitude of 0.905, this is the largest partial eclipse of the year, hiding much of the sun.

Solar eclipses occur during new moons, when the moon passes between the sun and the Earth. If the moon casts a shadow on the Earth during this phase, the result is an eclipse. From Earth, the result is that the moon seems to obscure the sun. (In contrast, lunar eclipses happen when a full moon passes into Earth’s shadow, obscuring our view of the moon. The next lunar eclipse will occur on Dec. 10, 2011.)

The number of solar eclipses varies each year between two and five. In 2011, there werefour solar eclipses. In 2012, astronomers predict just two. The next solar eclipse will be on May 20, 2012, and more Northern Hemisphere denizens will get a shot at seeing it: The eclipse will be viewable from eastern Asia to parts of the western United States.

from:    http://www.livescience.com/17179-nov-25-partial-solar-eclipse.html

Ah, the Elusive Solar Eclipse

REMOTE SOLAR ECLIPSE: If the Moon covers the sun and no one is around to see it, did the eclipse actually happen? Philosophical riddles may be all we get on July 1st (0840 UT) when the Moon covers 9.7% of the solar disk. Receiving an actual picture of the partial eclipse is unlikely because of its very remote location:

“This Southern Hemisphere event is visible from a D-shaped region in the Antarctic Ocean south of Africa,” says eclipse expert Fred Espenak of the Goddard Space Flight Center. “Such a remote and isolated path means that it may very well turn out to be the solar eclipse that nobody sees.”

to read more, go to:    http://spaceweather.com/

 

Connection-Lunar Eclipse, Earthquakes. Volcanoe

 

Total Lunar Eclipse – Earthquakes and Volcanoes That Follow

By Mitch Battros – Earth Changes Media
Jun 20, 2011 – 11:16:45 AM

 

What I am about to tell you should be considered ‘conjecture’ until adopted and established by the majority of world scientists; however what I will layout below is pure unabated ‘fact’. As many of you know, I am a researcher and author whom among other items, study the science-of-cycles. What I see coming based on this science is worthy of announcement.

 

This is not a warning of imminent danger, but rather a ‘tap on the shoulder’ to be aware of the possible consequences of June 15th total lunar eclipse. There is a noticeable cycle of escalation in earthquake and volcanic activity within two weeks prior and/or two weeks after a full lunar eclipse.

to read more, go to:    http://www.earthchangesmedia.com/publish/article-9162531044.php

 

 

Longest Total Lunar Eclipse in Years Wednesday

Longest Total Lunar Eclipse in 11 Years Occurs Wednesday

SPACE.com Staff
Date: 13 June 2011 Time: 07:33 AM ET
A total lunar eclipse is seen as the full moon is shadowed by the Earth on the arrival of the winter solstice, Tuesday, December 21, 2010 in Arlington, VA. From beginning to end, the eclipse lasted about three hours and twenty-eight minutes.
A total lunar eclipse is seen as the full moon is shadowed by the Earth on the arrival of the winter solstice, Tuesday, December 21, 2010 in Arlington, VA. From beginning to end, the eclipse lasted about three hours and twenty-eight minutes.
CREDIT: NASA/Bill Ingalls

The longest total lunar eclipse since July 2000 will occur on Wednesday (June 15), with skywatchers in Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Australia in prime position to witness the moon treat.

The event is the first lunar eclipse of 2011 and one of two total lunar eclipses this year. The eclipse, which will occur during June’s full moon, will begin at 1:24 p.m. EDT (1724 GMT) and last until 7 p.m. EDT (2300 GMT), but it will not be visible from North America.

For observers in regions where it will be visible, the eclipse could offer an amazing sight: the period of totality will be 100 minutes. In the last 100 years, only three other eclipses have rivaled the duration of totality of this eclipse, according to SPACE.com’s skywatching columnist Joe. Rao. The last lunar eclipse of similar length occured on July 16, 2000 and lasted 107 minutes.

to read more,. go to:   http://www.space.com/11941-extra-long-total-lunar-eclipse-occurs-wednesday.html