Natural Insect Repellents

12 plants that repel unwanted insects

These herbs and flowers can shoo pests from your garden and skin.

Lavender field

Lavender is among the plants that act as natural insect repellents. (Photo: Fred/flickr)

Are you an insect magnet? If you aren’t, you probably know one. Insect magnets attract annoying insects the second they walk outdoors — or so it seems.

If this describes you, take comfort in knowing that one of the ways you can fight back against mosquitoes, gnats, flies, no-see-ums and other pesky bugs doesn’t have to involve covering yourself with a sticky spray or engaging in chemical warfare. To help you enjoy going outdoors, try strategically placing insect-repelling plants in your garden or on your patio.

Essential oils in these plants act as nature’s bug repellent. Insects tend to avoid them. You can even use some of these plants to make your own natural bug repellent.

But know that simply including insect-repelling plants in your landscape will not in itself ensure your garden is insect free.

“There’s not enough research in this area to support that,” says Dr. Bodie Pennisi, an associate professor and extension landscape specialist at the University of Georgia’s Griffin campus. “The concentration of oils is not there to offer that kind of protection.”

There may be fewer insects, but no one’s done the research into how many plants, planted how close together, would be effective in repelling insects to any great extent, says Pennisi. One of the best things people can do to hold down mosquito populations, she advises, is to eliminate any standing water, which is where mosquitoes breed.

Globules on rosemary leavesFor those who would like to give the natural route a try, we’ve described six easy-to-find herbs readily available at most nurseries that are said to repel mosquitoes and other annoying insects. The smell from fragrant herbs is the result of the distribution of tiny globules that contain oils. High temperatures, for example, can cause the globules to become volatile, evaporating the essential oils and turning them into vapors, Pennisi says. The many globules on the underside of rosemary leaves (seen at right) are one of the best examples of this.

We’ve included our take on five ornamental flowers that can help keep plant-attacking insects at bay. Keeping your growing areas as insect free as possible will help your vegetable garden stay productive and your ornamental beds attractive. In addition, we’ve included a carnivorous plant that eats insects which you can also include in your eco-friendly insect barrier.

First, the herbs

Basil

basil plantYou can keep basil in pots to repel insects or make it into a repellent spray. (Photo: arifm/flickr)

Repels house flies and mosquitoes. Plant basil in containers by your house doors and in outdoor areas where you like to relax or entertain. Basil is delicious in salads, in many pork and chicken recipes and with a variety of soups. Basil also improves the flavors of certain vegetables, include tomatoes, peppers and asparagus. You also can use fresh basil to make an insect repellent spray. A simple recipe calls for pouring 4 ounces of boiling water into a container holding 4 to 6 ounces of clean, fresh basil leaves (stems can be attached), letting the leaves steep for several hours, removing the leaves and squeezing all of the leaves’ moisture into the mixture. Then thoroughly mix 4 ounces of (cheap!) vodka with the basil-water mixture. Store in the refrigerator and apply as a spray when going outdoors. Be sure to keep the spray away from your eyes, nose and mouth.

Lavender

dried lavenderPlace dried lavender is bundles to keep flies out of your home. (Photo: Tatiana Mihaliova/Shutterstock)

Repels moths, fleas, flies and mosquitoes. Lavender has been used for centuries to add a pleasantly sweet fragrance to homes and clothes drawers. Although people love the smell of lavender, mosquitoes, flies and other unwanted insects hate it. Place tied bouquets in your home to help keep flies outdoors. Plant it in sunny areas of the garden or near entryways to your house to help keep those areas pest free. You can also use oil extracted from the flowers as a mosquito repellent you can apply to exposed skin when going into the garden or patio. The Everything Lavender website has a guide for extracting the oil and making a lavender-infused body oil. Added benefits are that lavender oil nourishes the skin and has a calming effect that induces sleep.

Lemongrass

lemongrassThe oil of lemongrass contains citral, geraniol, myrcene, limonene and citronellal, a natural oil often found in insect-repelling candles. (Photo: Iqbal Osman/flickr)

Repels mosquitoes. You’ve no doubt seen citronella candles in stores during the summer and read how citronella will keep mosquitoes away. Citronella is a natural oil found in lemongrass, an ornamental that can grow up to 4 feet tall and 3 feet wide in one season. (It’s worth noting that lemongrass isn’t just the name of one plant; it’s the umbrella name for plants in the Cymbopogon family, which also includes citronella grass.) This grass with wonderful culinary uses is hardy only in South Florida (Zone 10), so almost everyone else will have to grow it as an annual. It does well in a pot or in the ground in a sunny, well-drained location. Use its fragrant, narrow leaves in chicken and pork dishes and to flavor soups and salad dressing. Many Asian recipes call for lemongrass.

Lemon thyme

lemon thymeBruise the leaves on this hardy plant to repel mosquitoes. (Photo: Andrea_44/flickr)

Repels mosquitoes. This hardy herb can adapt to dry or rocky, shallow soil and will thrive in your herb garden, a rock garden or a front border as long as these are in sunny locations. The plant itself will not repel pesky mosquitoes. To release its chemicals, you must first bruise the leaves. To do this, simply cut off a few stems and rub them between your hands. Before you do that, though, it’s advisable to make sure the plant’s natural properties will not adversely affect you. Determine your tolerance by rubbing crushed leaves on a small area on your forearm for several days.

Mint

mint placeMint spreads aggressively so it’s best grown in pots unless you want it to take over your yard. (Photo: Edsel Little/flickr)

Repels mosquitoes. Mint is best grown in pots rather than the ground because it spreads aggressively. Once established in the garden, it can be difficult to remove. Cuttings of mint in mulch can help broccoli, cabbage and turnips. The leaves are commonly used to flavor minty iced tea. The aromatic properties found in the leaves are also present in the stems and flowers. With a little work, the plant’s aromatic oils can be extracted and combined with apple cider vinegar and cheap vodka (or witch hazel) to make a mosquito repellent. Containers of mint strategically placed in the garden or on the patio will help keep nearby plants insect free.

Rosemary

rosemaryHome cooks love rosemary as much as insects hate it. (Photo: Alice Henneman/flickr)

Repels mosquitoes and a variety of insects harmful to vegetable plants. Rosemary is available in various forms. Plants can be grown in containers on a patio and shaped into ornamental pyramids, grown in herb gardens or planted in landscaped beds, where some varieties can grow quite large. Rosemary’s oils are as delicious to home cooks who use herbs as they are unpleasant to many insects. The plant itself and its cuttings are effective repellents. You can make a simple repellent spray by boiling 1 quart of dried rosemary in a quart of water for 20 to 30 minutes and then straining the liquid into a container at least a half-gallon in size that contains a quart of cool water. Put a cap on the combined liquid and store it in the refrigerator. Add the repellent to small squirt bottles as needed when going outdoors. Discard the remaining repellent in the refrigerator when it no longer has a strong telltale smell of rosemary.

Other herbs

  • Bay leaves: Repel flies. When you grow this plant, you won’t have to rely on the dried leaves from stores to add flavor to roasts and soups. Just pick the leaves as you need them.
  • Chives: Repel carrot flies, Japanese beetle and aphids.
  • Dill: Repels aphids, squash bugs, spider mites, cabbage loopers and tomato hornworms.
  • Fennel: Repels aphids, slugs and snails.
  • Lemon balm: Repels mosquitoes.
  • Oregano: Repels many pests and will provide ground cover and humidity for peppers.
  • Parsley: Repels asparagus beetles.
  • Thyme: Repels whiteflies, cabbage loopers, cabbage maggots, corn earworms, whiteflies, tomato hornworms and small whites.

Next up: Ornamental flowers

Alliums

alliumBeautiful tall alliums will keep insects out of your vegetable garden. (Photo: Toshihiro Gomo/flickr)

Plants in the Allium family, such as the dramatic Allium giganteum whose flower heads adorn stalks up to 6 feet tall, are regarded as a broad-spectrum natural insecticide. They repel numerous insects that plague vegetable gardens, including slugs, aphids, carrot flies and cabbage worms. Plants that will benefit from the proximity of alliums include tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, cabbage, broccoli, kohlrabi and carrots. They also will keep aphids off rose bushes. Alliums include small-growing herbs such as chives and garlic chives, leeks and shallots.

Chrysanthemums

mumsThe ingredient in chrysanthemums that makes them so effective as an insect repellent is pyrethrum. (Photo: Costel Slincu/flickr)

Repel roaches, ants, Japanese beetles, ticks, silverfish, lice, fleas, bedbugs, spider mites, harlequin bugs and root-knot nematodes. The ingredient in chrysanthemums that makes them so effective as an insect-repelling companion plant is pyrethrum. Because pyrethrums can kill flying and jumping insects, they are used in America’s most commonly available home and garden insecticide and are frequently used in indoor sprays, pet shampoos and aerosol bombs. Although chrysanthemum flowers can be used to make an insecticidal spray, pyrethrum can be carcinogenic to humans and care should be taken in using them in this form. Make sure you know the risks.

Marigolds

marigoldsAphids, mosquitoes and even rabbits don’t like the smell of marigolds. (Photo: Swaminathan/flickr)

The scent from various types of marigolds repels aphids, mosquitoes and even rabbits. The roots of marigolds are well-known among farmers to repel nematodes, though those qualities require a year to take effect. Grow marigolds as an annual in most parts of the country, mixed in along the border of your flower beds or interspersed throughout your vegetable garden as they can also spur on the growth of certain plants, especially roses. Although marigolds are easy to grow in sunny locations, they can fall victim to gray mold, several types of leaf spot, powdery mildew, damping off and root rot.

Nasturtiums

nasturtiumNasturtiums release an airborne chemical that repels insects. (Photo: Christian Guthier/flickr)

Repel whiteflies, squash bugs, aphids, many beetles and cabbage loopers. Nasturtiums could be considered the poster child for companion planting, which is growing a variety of plants close to one another for the benefits each brings to the others. Nasturtiums release an airborne chemical that repels predacious insects, protecting not just the nasturtium but other plants in the grouping. Because many of the insects nasturtiums repel favor vegetables — tomatoes, cucumbers, kale, kohlrabi, collards, broccoli, cabbage and radishes — nasturtiums are an idea choice for planting along the edges of vegetable gardens. Fortunately, nasturtiums do not repel the all-important pollinator — the bumblebee.

Petunias

petunia_0Some people think of petunias as nature’s pesticide. (Photo: Wendy Cutler/flickr)

Repel aphids, tomato hornworms, asparagus beetles, leafhoppers and squash bugs. Some people think of petunias as nature’s pesticide. They are popular mostly because they are available in a variety of bright colors, require such minimal maintenance they are almost foolproof to grow and can be grown in garden beds, containers or hanging baskets. Plant them in sunny areas near vegetables and herbs such as beans, tomatoes, peppers and basil.

Other ornamental flowers

  • Common lantanas: Repel mosquitoes.
  • Four o’clocks: Attract but poison Japanese beetle.
  • Geraniums: Repel leafhoppers.
  • Narcissus: Repel moles.

Then the carnivorous plants

Pitcher plants

pitcher_plantPitcher plants trap and eat insects. (Photo: Eric Sonstroem/flickr)

Trap and ingest insects. Pitcher plants are the largest group of carnivorous plants. These exotic-looking plants lure insects into their “pitcher,” actually a specialized leaf, through a combination of nectar, fragrance and color. Once inside the pitcher, the insect finds itself on a slippery surface with downward-facing hairs. The insect then either slips or falls into a pool of water. Once in the water, it drowns or dies of exhaustion in trying to escape, which is impossible because of the downward-facing hairs. The plant then digests the insect. Insects that most often fall prey to North American pitcher plants are ants, flies, wasps, bees, beetles, slugs and snails. Pitcher plants, which grow in bogs in the wild, need a sunny area that stays moist, generally a difficult combination for home gardeners. Growing them in pots sitting in a saucer of water is easier. However, don’t keep the growing medium too wet. It just needs to be moist.

Others

  • Venus flytrap: Consumes ants and other insects.

Rosemary globules photo: Courtesy Bodie Pennisi

from:    https://www.mnn.com/your-home/organic-farming-gardening/stories/12-plants-that-repel-unwanted-insects

The Importance of Rainforests

Facts About Rainforests

This interior part of the Amazon rainforest is one of the most diverse corners of the Amazon basin. A hectare of forest typically contains 250 species of large trees.

Credit: Nigel Pitman | The Field Museum

Rainforests are found all over the world — in West and Central Africa, South and Central America, Indonesia, Southeast Asia and Australia — on every continent except Antarctica. They are vitally important, producing most of the oxygen we breathe and providing habitat for half of the planet’s flora and fauna.

The term “rainforest” has a wide classification. Typically, rainforests are lush, humid, hot stretches of land covered in tall, broadleaf evergreen trees, usually found around the equator. These areas usually get rain year-round, typically more than 70 inches (1,800 millimeters) a year, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica. Various types of forests, such as monsoon forests, mangrove forests and temperate forests, can be considered rainforests. Here’s what makes them different:

  • Temperate rainforests consist of coniferous or broadleaf trees and are found in the temperate zones. They are identified as rainforests by the large amount of rain they receive.
  • Mangrove rainforests are, like their name, made of mangrove trees. These trees grow only in brackish waters where rivers meet the ocean.
  • Monsoon rainforests are also called “dry rainforests” because they have a dry season. These get around 31 to 71 inches (800 mm to 1,800 mm) of rain. Up to 75 percent of the trees in dry rainforests can be deciduous.

Most rainforests are very warm, with an average temperature of 86 degrees Fahrenheit (30 degrees Celsius) during the day and 68 degrees F (20 degrees C) at night.

A rainforest consists of two major areas. The very top part is called the canopy, which can be as tall as 98 feet to 164 feet (30 to 50 meters). This area is comprised of the tops of trees and vines. The rest, below the canopy, is called the understory. This can include ferns, flowers, vines, tree trunks and dead leaves.

Some animals stay in the canopy and rarely ever come down to the ground. Some of these animals include monkeys, flying squirrels and sharp-clawed woodpeckers, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica.

Upper montane cloud forest during rainfall at Mt. Kinabalu in Malaysia.
Upper montane cloud forest during rainfall at Mt. Kinabalu in Malaysia.

Credit: L. A. Bruijnzeel and I. S. M. Sieverding

The rainforest is home to many plants and animals. According to The Nature Conservancy, a 4-square-mile (2,560 acres) area of rainforest contains as many as 1,500 flowering plants, 750 species of trees, 400 species of birds and 150 species of butterflies. The Amazon rainforest alone contains around 10 percent of the world’s known species.

Just about every type of animal lives in rainforests. In fact, though rainforests cover less than 2 percent of Earth’s total surface area, they are home to 50 percent of Earth’s plants and animals, according to The Nature Conservancy. For example, rhinoceroses, deer, leopards, gorillas, chimpanzees, elephants, armadillos and even bears can be found living in rainforests across the world.

Many unusual animals and plants have been discovered in rainforests. For example, the fairy lantern parasite (Thismia neptunis) reappeared in the rainforest of Borneo, Malaysia, in 2018, 151 years after it was first documented. This plant sucks on underground fungi and doesn’t need sunlight to survive. “To our knowledge, it is only the second finding of the species in total,” the Czech team of researchers wrote in a paper, which was published Feb. 21, 2018, in the journal Phytotaxa.

Some of the animals are also unusual. For example, the tapir is a mammal that looks like a mix between an anteater and a pig and can be found in the rainforests of South America and Asia. The stunning silverback gorillalives in the rainforest of the Central African Republic. Forest giraffes, or okapi, a strange-looking cross between a horse and a zebra, also inhabit the African rainforest.

One particularly surprising rainforest find is a spider as big as a puppy. The massive South American Goliath birdeater (Theraphosa blondi) is the world’s largest spider, according to Guinness World Records. Each leg can reach up to 1 foot (30 centimeters) long, and it can weigh up to 6 ounces (170 grams).

Seventy percent of the plants identified by the U.S. National Cancer Institute as useful in the treatment of cancer are found only in rainforests, according to The Nature Conservancy. Scientists have identified more than 2,000 tropical forest plants as having anti-cancer properties. However, less than 1 percent of tropical rainforest species have been analyzed for their medicinal value.

Rainforests are found on every continent except Antarctica. Map shows tropical rainforests in dark green and temperate rainforests in light green.
Rainforests are found on every continent except Antarctica. Map shows tropical rainforests in dark green and temperate rainforests in light green.

Credit: Ville Koistinen

Humans and animals rely on the rainforest to make the majority of Earth’s oxygen. One tree produces nearly 260 lbs. of oxygen each year, according to the Growing Air Foundation, and 1 hectare (2.47 acres) of rainforest may contain over 750 types of trees.

A tree uses carbon dioxide to grow. A living tree draws in and stores twice as much carbon dioxide than a fallen tree releases. But when the tree is cut down, it releases its stored carbon dioxide. For example, dead Amazonian trees emit an estimated 1.9 billion tons (1.7 billion metric tons) of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere each year, according to a study published in the journal Nature Communications in 2014. The same trees typically absorb about 2.2 billion tons (2 billion metric tons) of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide makes up around 82.2 percent of all U.S. greenhouse gas, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Out of the 6 million square miles (15 million square kilometers) of tropical rainforest that once existed worldwide, only 2.4 million square miles (6 million square km) remain, and only 50 percent, or 75 million square acres (30 million hectares), of temperate rainforests still exists, according to The Nature Conservancy. Ranching, mining, logging and agriculture are the main reasons for forest loss. Between 2000 and 2012, more than 720,000 square miles (2 million square km) of forests around the world were cut down — an area about the size of all the states east of the Mississippi River.

Deforestation around the world also decreases the global flow of water vapor from land by 4 percent, according to an article published by the journal National Academy of Sciences. Water constantly cycles through the atmosphere. It evaporates from the surface and rises, condensing into clouds. It is blown by the wind, and then falls back to Earth as rain or snow. In addition, water vapor is the most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, according to NASA. Even a slight change in the flow of water vapor can disrupt weather patterns and climates.

“Rainforests are under increasing threats for many reasons, including logging, clearing for crops or cattle, and conversion to commercial palm oil plantations,” Jonathan Losos, director of the Living Earth Collaborative and William H. Danforth Distinguished University Professor for the Department of Biology, at Washington University in St. Louis, told Live Science. “On top of that, the changing climate is having adverse effects on rainforest health. Last year was an especially bad one for the Amazon, with a substantial uptick in the rate of deforestation.”

On the other hand, Losos said, there are some glimmers of hope:

  • The two countries with the largest amount of rainforest – Indonesia and Brazil – have both acknowledged the importance of these forests and have taken innovative and aggressive efforts to halt deforestation.
  • There is a growing understanding that halting deforestation and reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are closely linked; new, large-scale efforts are under way to address both concerns.
  • While there is a continued decline in primary rainforests, a bright spot is the fact that in many tropical countries, there is an extensive regeneration of secondary forests, which are critical to supporting much of these countries’ biodiversity.

 

  • from:    https://www.livescience.com/63196-rainforest-facts.html

Fissure Opens at Yellowstone

Yellowstone Volcano latest: Grand Teton National Park closed due to fissure | Science | News

The giant crack in the Wyoming–based national park has prompted officials to shut down areas from tourists in case of landslides.

The Grand Teton National Park said in a statement: “The Hidden Falls and Inspiration Point areas are currently closed due to elevated potential for rockfall.

“The area was closed to protect human safety on July 10 after expanding cracks in a rock buttress were detected.

“It is unknown how long the closure will be in effect. Geologists are monitoring the buttress for movement and have initiated a risk assessment for the area.”

It is currently unclear how the crack opened but it is likely due to normal seismic activity in the national park area.

Despite being around 100 kilometres from the Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton does sit over the Yellowstone supervolcano.

If it was seismic activity beneath Grand Teton which caused the fissure, it could be a sign that Yellowstone is reawakening.

If the Wyoming volcano were to erupt an estimated 87,000 people would be killed immediately and two-thirds of the USA would immediately be made uninhabitable.

The large spew of ash into the atmosphere would block out sunlight and directly affect life beneath it creating a “nuclear winter”.

The massive eruption could be a staggering 6,000 times as powerful as the one from Washington’s Mount St Helens in 1980 which killed 57 people and deposited ash in 11 different states and five Canadian provinces.

If the volcano explodes, a climate shift would ensue as the volcano would spew massive amounts of sulphur dioxide into the atmosphere, which can form a sulphur aerosol that reflects and absorbs sunlight.

from:    http://scienceglobalnews.com/uncategorized/yellowstone-volcano-latest-grand-teton-national-park-closed-due-to-fissure-science-news/

Giants & Mound Builders in North America

Huge Historical Blackout: The Astrological Mound Builders of Ancient North America

June 14, 2018

By Arjun Walla

IN BRIEF

  • The Facts:Strong evidence points to the reality that giants existed on earth. Many ancient cultures recognized this. Many of these beings had great knowledge of the stars and astrology.
  • Reflect On:How much of our history is actually true? How much has been held back? When you begin to stretch your consciousness outside of simple everyday life as we know it, we begin to explore actual reality.

It’s truly mind-altering to contemplate history, I usually start with the fact that most of our recorded history remains in secrecy. The US Government alone, according to some historians, classifies approximately 500 million pages of documents every single year.

How can a researcher, historian, or anybody who is interested in diving into the archives of US history, for example, expect to find anything of any real substance that actually pertains to the truth?  History is written by the victors, and most major historical events are full of information and facts that don’t really show up in our secondary and post-secondary ‘educational’ textbooks. These days, no matter how much evidence and fact support a topic, if that topic and information simply defies beliefs, or offends current upheld belief systems (many of which are based on lies), then it is rejected.

We see this in all disciplines today, a great example would be the connection between consciousness and our physical material world, as demonstrated numerous times repeatedly by quantum physics. Despite the fact that we are told these rules only apply at the quantum level, there are several examples which show that, no, they can be applied at the classical level as well.  Cases of mind influencing matter have been reported throughout history and across many cultures, more specifically in regard to ‘supernormal’ abilities which include telepathy, psychokinesis, and other phenomena that lie within the realms of parapsychology. This is evident in ancient literature, from the Vedic texts and the yoga sutras to Jesus, Moses, Milarepa,  Mohammed and more. It’s also evident via declassified CIA documents, some of which you can access here.

What is going on here? Just as there is a scientific blackout in many cases, we also have historical blackouts and a modern-day blackout of information and discoveries that are made by the black budget world. A 1997 US Senate reportdescribed them as “so sensitive that they are exempt from standard reporting requirements to the Congress.”

Yet we still reject these blackouts and historical facts are no different. What about the Giants of North America? Have discoveries been ‘covered-up’ simply because they don’t fit the framework of accepted knowledge? It sure seems that way, especially because you won’t see any mention of giants in our textbooks. Perhaps that’s because they don’t fit in with the supposed theory of evolution? Is this information just too paradigm shifting? Where what we once thought we knew, is not true anymore? Kind of like another, ‘the Earth is not flat’ type of moment…

Giants are found within the lore of multiple cultures, from the indigenous to the ancient past, but bones have also been discovered on numerous occasions.

“It calls up the indefinite past. When Columbus first sought this continent—when Christ suffered on the cross—when Moses led Israel through the Red-Sea—nay, even, when Adam first came from the hand of his Maker—then as now, Niagara was roaring here. The eyes of that species of extinct giants, whose bones fill the mounds of America, have gazed on Niagara, as ours do now.” – Lincoln

A discovery was made in 1883 when the Smithsonian (the United States government/military-led organization) dispatched a team of archaeologists to the South Charleston Mound. The report indicates that the team uncovered numerous giant skeletons ranging from 7 to 9 feet tall. They were decorated with heavy copper bracelets and other religious/cultural items. The report also mentioned that some of them had a skull that was of  “the compressed or flat-head type.” This would resemble similar skeletal characteristics to those found in South America and Egypt. (source)

Going back further still, in 1774 settlers found what they called “The Giant Town,” which housed several gigantic skeletons, one being an eight-foot-tall male. (source)

You can read more about that in the articles we’ve written previously about the subject, and see some examples. From New York Times articles and more, the evidence of giants is great.

The Ceremonial Astrological Mound Builders of Ancient North America

Another interesting topic I recently came across, was, just like Pyramids, and many other ‘wonders’ of the world built with remarkable mathematical precision and synchronicities, are the ancient structures in North America that’s been completely ignored by mainstream history.

Jim Vieira is a stonemason, writer, and star of History Channel’s Search for the Lost Giants had his TED talk banned. The banned TED talks are always the most fascinating, my favorite from Russel Targ, who was a physicist contracted by the CIA to create the STARGATE project, a program investigating parapsychological phenomena, where he shared everything he knows about ESP. It was banned simply because it was too controversial, similar to Vieira’s talk as well.

In one of Jim’s talks, he describes a structure, one of many which have apparently been found all over America, that goes to show just how interesting and mysterious, and advanced these beings are. It’s one of many pieces of the puzzle showing that extremely advanced, highly intelligent ancient civilizations once roamed the Earth, and many of them have been completely blacked out from history. Perhaps the ‘history makers’ wrote their own version and decided to cut out information that wouldn’t fit in with their plan to control the narrative of what is and what was.

In it, he describes “ceremonial” stone-works that have been found in New-England, these structures have been carbon dated, according to the talk, to thousands of years old, every single one of them, “but there’s a historical blackout,” according to Vieira, especially in New England.

He goes on to show a picture of the Goshen Stone chamber, one of the hundreds in New England. What’s remarkable about these structures is that the majority of them are oriented to the equinox sunrise or winter solstice sunrise.

Below is a picture he took on March 12th from the chamber:

He then goes on to say, “we are told that these are colonial root sellers.”This one has a 10-tonne sailing, and as a stone mason, he explains how the structure itself is quite a feet, which is why he has a suspicion that they might have been built by the giants which exist in ancient lore.

Another interesting shot from the talk, this particular structure (Goshen Stone) has a stone line shaft created in the chamber which allows the Equinox sunset to come through twice a year, only on those days.

Again, he also cites lab work done which sites carbon date reading of thousands of years old. So that would completely shatter the current mainstream accepted explanation, that these are simply colonial root sellers… How crazy is that?

You can check out the full TED talk below:

The Ancients Obsession With Astrology

The evidence for intelligent ancient civilizations that have been left out of the historical record is grand, but even the ones that have not been left out show a tremendous knowledge of astrology, planets, and facts about the cosmos that we didn’t discover ourselves till only a few decades ago, like the existence of Pluto, for example.

From the indigenous all the way to ancient Sumeria, astrology has obviously played a huge key role among these societies and was extremely relevant, yet today, this topic and its importance are brushed off as pseudoscience. I personally have no doubt the movement of the cosmos and the way it affects human consciousness is something real, yet perhaps not well understood, but it’s making a comeback.

There is a lot of validity behind such concepts and beliefs, but they are brushed off today simply because we’ve been trained to believe that this type of thing is bogus, when really, it’s far from it and once understood it could be of tremendous use to humanity, especially for goodwill.

from:     https://www.collective-evolution.com/2018/06/14/huge-historical-blackout-the-astrological-mound-builders-of-ancient-north-america/

Legacy of Standing Rock

What Standing Rock Gave the World

Americans saw the Indigenous struggle—the violence, stolen resources, colluding corporations and governments—that goes hand in hand with protecting the Earth.
SRMonet1440.jpg

At the height of the movement at Standing Rock, Indigenous teens half a world away in Norway were tattooing their young bodies with an image of a black snake. Derived from Lakota prophecy, the creature had come to represent the controversial Dakota Access pipeline for the thousands of water protectors determined to try to stop it.

It was a show of international solidarity between the Indigenous Sami and the Lakota. “They got tattoos because of the Norwegian money invested in the pipeline,” said Jan Rune Måsø, editor of the Sami news division of Norway’s largest media company, NRK.

Rune Måsø said the story about the tattoos was just one of about a hundred that his team of journalists covered over the course of the months-long pipeline battle in North Dakota. One of them, “The War on the Black Snake,” was awarded top honors at a journalism conference held in Trømsø in November. That story revealed large investments Norwegian banks had made to advance the $3.8 billion energy project, spurring a divestment campaign by the Sami Parliament.

The backstory can be told simply. As early as April 2016, Indigenous activists protested the pipeline’s threat to the Standing Rock Sioux’s primary water supply, the Missouri River. While battles were fought in federal courts, representatives of hundreds of Indigenous groups from around the world—the Maori, the Sami, and the Sarayaku, to name a few—arrived. Temporary communities of thousands were created on the reservation borderlands in nonviolent resistance against the crude oil project. Police arrested more than 800 people, and many water protectors faced attack dogs, concussion grenades, rubber bullets, and, once, a water cannon on a freezing night in November. Last February, armored vehicles and police in riot gear cleared the last of the encampments. Recently, investigative journalism by The Intercept has documented that the paramilitary security firm TigerSwan was hired by DAPL parent Energy Transfer Partners to guide North Dakota law enforcement in treating the movement as a “national security threat.”

Oil now flows through the pipeline under the Missouri.

But this Indigenous-led disruption, the awakening resolve that was cultivated at Standing Rock, did not dissolve after February. Rather, it spread in so many different directions that we may never fully realize its reach. The spirit of resistance can easily be found in the half-dozen or so other pipeline battles across the United States. Beyond that, the movement amplified the greater struggle worldwide: treaty rights, sacred sites, and the overall stand to protect Indigenous land and life.

To be sure, post-colonization has always demanded acknowledgment of Indigenous autonomy. It’s what spurred months of international advocacy when Haudenosaunee Chief Deskaheh attempted to speak before the League of Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1923. He wanted to remind the world that European colonizers had honored Iroquois Confederacy nationhood upon entering treaty agreements under the two row wampum.

The stand at Standing Rock, then, was not anything new—just more modern.

Google the words “the next Standing Rock” and you get a smattering of circumstances, mostly posed in the form of a question: Bears Ears, Line 3, Yucca Mountain. “The Next Standing Rock?” the headlines ask.

The story of White Clay, Nebraska, is indicative. When the last tipis came down at Standing Rock, Clarence Matthew III, a middle-aged Sicangu Lakota man better known by his camp nickname, Curly, spared little time migrating to the South Dakota–Nebraska border. There, another fight for justice was mounting, for families living on the neighboring Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. This one focused on a decades-long dispute over beer sales targeted at Native American customers mostly prone to alcohol addiction.

Demands turned to broader issues: investigation of dozens of unsolved crimes in White Clay against Native Americans. “Once we got down there, they started telling us about the problems they’ve had, more than just alcohol, the murders, the rapes, and everything that was on the bad side of that alcohol problem,” Matthew said. “It just broke my heart to hear all that.”

Matthew had been caretaker of one of the main communities at Standing Rock, and he settled right in at Camp Justice at the edge of Pine Ridge. He was there with his “water protector family,” others who have adopted camping as an active form of protest.

We’re starting to see other Indigenous communities rise up and say, Let us all speak now.

For all the momentum that the resistance at Standing Rock brought, the Indigenous rights movement in the 21st century faces increasing challenges. Tribal nations tread cautiously under the administration of Donald Trump. Internationally, the militarized protection of extractive energy projects and theft of land persist, despite glaring media attention paid to the rising number of Indigenous peoples killed or jailed for their activism in the face of it.

In a final push for re-election last fall, Standing Rock’s Dave Archambault II gave what would be his last interview as chairman to tribal radio station KLND. Archambault used the airtime to speak matter-of-factly about how the movement had shifted the tribe’s potent public image away from the reservation. “It used to be cool to be Indian; now it’s cool to be from Standing Rock.

“This movement was significant, not just for Standing Rock, but for all of Indian Country and around the world. We made some noise and now we’re starting to see other Indigenous communities rise up and say, Let us all speak now, and it’s pretty powerful and moving,” he said.

Less than a week later and on the same day that the state of North Dakota accepted a $15 million gift from Energy Transfer Partners, Archambault was unseated by former council member Mike Faith, who has said publicly that he believes the overall movement hurt Standing Rock’s economy and neglected daily life for tribal members.

The difference of opinion between the two leaders is a conflict that often lies at the heart of tribal community: protecting the Earth or protecting the Indigenous peoples.

On the eve of Thanksgiving 2017, when the Keystone pipeline ruptured and spilled 210,000 gallons of oil in neighboring South Dakota, the newly elected Faith remained notably silent while water protectors responded with outrage, most loudly, closest to home.

Sustaining this awakening is the next great task.

“Ironically, this week most Americans will be sitting down and giving thanks when last year at this time my people were being shot, gassed, and beaten for trying to keep this very thing from happening,” Chairman Harold Frazier from the neighboring Cheyenne River Sioux tribe said in a statement. Like Archambault and other tribal leaders, Frazier was arrested for participating in the Standing Rock occupation.

Leadership in the Indigenous world is not only a difficult balance, but also dangerous.

In Honduras, activist Bertha Zuniga Cáceres is fighting for Indigenous rights in one of the most militarized regions in the world. She is the daughter of Berta Cáceres, the Indigenous Lenca woman who was assassinated after leading a successful campaign to halt construction of the Agua Zarca Dam. Now she is seeking justice for her mother’s death.

The 26-year-old Cáceres is also campaigning to suspend all U.S. military aid to Honduras. In July, she survived an attack by a group of assailants wielding machetes. Just weeks earlier she had been named the new leader of the Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras, the nonprofit organization formerly led by her mother.

“Many organizations, many NGOs, many Indigenous groups are struggling in how to sustain the work that they are doing in the face of these attacks,” said Katharina Rall, a researcher for Human Rights Watch.

Last year, after the military-style assaults on the camps at Standing Rock, Human Rights Watch expanded its agenda to include a program focused on the environment as a human right. “The fact that we now have an environment and human rights program at our organization is a reflection of this reality that a lot of people face,” Rall said.

Meantime, the organization Global Witness reports that it has never been deadlier to take a stand against companies that steal land and destroy the Earth. In 2016, the watchdog group found that nearly four activists a week are murdered fighting against mining, logging, and other extractive resource development.

Traditional knowledge has kept us in harmony with Mother Earth.

As disturbing as this reality is, it is unsurprising then to recall the military-style violence at Standing Rock: the rows of riot police pointing their guns at unarmed activists standing in the river; tanks shooting water in freezing temperatures at a crowd of people gathered on a bridge. In this one regard, Standing Rock was not unique in the world. It had become crucially important. Americans saw the global struggle faced by the estimated 370 million Indigenous people—the violence, stolen resources, colluding corporations and governments that go hand in hand with protecting the Earth.

Sustaining this awakening is the next great task.

Climate change poses one of the most serious reminders of why the sacred fires ignited at Standing Rock must continue to burn: Indigenous peoples and their knowledge and value systems matter.

At November’s COP23 climate conference in Bonn, Germany, Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim was dressed in traditional Mbororo regalia when she stood in a conference hall demanding that Indigenous knowledge systems be properly acknowledged in Paris Agreement negotiations. The girl who once tended cattle in the region of Chad bordering northeastern Nigeria has now become a bridge for her people and government officials making decisions impacting the fragile ecosystem of Lake Chad, the lifeline for the Mbororo.

“Traditional knowledge has kept us from century to century to be in harmony with Mother Earth,” Ibrahim said. “These knowledges will make for all the difference, but we cannot wait years and years, because climate is changing, and it’s impacting the Earth.”

Other members of the Indigenous Caucus at Bonn say inserting traditional knowledge into the climate talks doesn’t go far enough. Jannie Staffansson, a representative of the Saami Council, wants what Chief Deskaheh had petitioned to the League of Nations nearly a century earlier: sovereign recognition for Indigenous Peoples on an international scale. It would allow equity at the negotiating table—a level playing field to fairly deal with the consequences of a warming planet in the face of land grabs and natural resource extraction.

“Why is it always that Indigenous peoples need to pay for other people’s wealth?” said Staffansson. She paused to check the Snapchat account she had been using to engage with a young Sami audience while at COP, a demographic similar to the teens who got tattoos of the black snake.

“I had friends that went to Standing Rock,” said the 27-year-old. “I was envious of their trip to support self-determination. Self-determination and a just transition is what we have to take into account.”

“We need climate justice in everything we do.”

Jenni Monet wrote this article for The Decolonize Issue, the Spring 2018 issue of YES! Magazine. Jenni is an award-winning journalist and tribal member of the Pueblo of Laguna in New Mexico. She’s also executive producer and host of the podcast Still Here.

from:    http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/decolonize/what-standing-rock-gave-the-world-20180316

What’s Going on in Oregon?

March 24, 2018 Update: “Something’s Not Right in Southern Oregon”

— “I have 2 large bird feeders and 2 hummingbird feeders that I’ve been refilling all winter — until about a week ago! Nothing — no birds! We also have a large population of geese that are always in our park, but nothing for over a week?”

– GG, Worried Resident, Grants Pass Oregon valley


“Are we about to experience a severe natural disaster?”

– Resident, Rogue Valley, Oregon on March 19, 2018

Rogue Valley, Oregon, is 11 miles north of Medford. It's in southwestern Oregon along the middle Rogue River and its tributaries in Josephine and Jackson counties near the California border. The largest communities in Rogue Valley are Medford, Ashland and Grants Pass.
Rogue Valley, Oregon, is 11 miles north of Medford. It’s in southwestern Oregon along the middle Rogue River and its tributaries in Josephine and Jackson counties near the California border. The largest communities in Rogue Valley are Medford, Ashland and Grants Pass.
Rogue Valley, Oregon, with the Crater Lake National Park 42°54′43″N 122°08′53″W to the east that encompasses the caldera of a destroyed volcano, Mount Mazama, and the surrounding hills and forests. Crater Lake is 1,949 feet (595 m) deep, which is the deepest lake in the United States.
Rogue Valley, Oregon, with the Crater Lake National Park 42°54′43″N 122°08′53″W to the east that encompasses the caldera of a destroyed volcano, Mount Mazama, and the surrounding hills and forests. Crater Lake is 1,949 feet (595 m) deep, which is the deepest lake in the United States.

UPDATE – March 24, 2018 Rogue Valley, Oregon – Since my March 19th Earthfiles report and March 21st Earthfiles YouTube Update about the puzzling and disturbing lack of birds in Rogue Valley, Oregon, near Medford, and possible link to impending earthquake in the Cascadia Subduction Zone there, I have received the following comments from viewers and listeners.

Return to Part 1.

1)

To: Linda Moulton Howe <earthfiles@earthfiles.com>
Re: Birds Also Missing in Grants Pass Oregon valley
Date: March 23, 2018

Morning,
I live in the Grants Pass Oregon valley. I have only lived here for a few years, but one of my joys of the valley is feeding my birds! Swallows, hummingbirds, robins throughout the season and especially the winter. I have 2 large bird feeders and 2 hummingbird feeders that I’ve been refilling all winter — until about a week ago! Nothing — no birds! We also have a large population of geese that are always in our park, but nothing for over a week?

We also own a home in the Smith River Oregon area. We have also noticed our large robin population has vacated?
We have lived in that area for over 40 years. The robins are always, always early morning feeders for us. Have not seen ANY in over a week?

We will be even more aware now to see what our large elk population and wildlife are doing….

GG,
Worried

To read more, go to link:      from:    https://www.earthfiles.com/2018/03/24/march-24-2018-update-somethings-not-right-in-southern-oregon/

More Activity at Yellowstone

Is it about to blow? Yellowstone supervolcano is hit by 878 earthquakes in just over TWO WEEKS – the most active it has been for five years

  • Strongest earthquake of 4.4 magnitude hit on Thursday 15 June 
  • This could be a warning sign of an impending eruption of the supervolcano
  • If it did erupt, it would be one thousand times as powerful as Mount St Helens

A swarm of nearly 900 earthquakes have hit Yellowstone National Park since 12 June, according to experts.

The park sits on one of the world’s most dangerous supervolcanoes and recent activity has raised fears the supervolcano is about to blow.

If it were to erupt, the Yellowstone volcano would be one thousand times as powerful as the 1980 Mount St Helens eruption, experts claim – although they say the risk is ‘low’.

A swarm of hundreds of earthquakes have hit Yellowstone National Park with up to 4.4 magnitude. The Grand Prismatic hot spring (pictured) is among the park's many hydrothermal features created by the supervolcano (stock image)

A swarm of hundreds of earthquakes have hit Yellowstone National Park with up to 4.4 magnitude. The Grand Prismatic hot spring (pictured) is among the park’s many hydrothermal features created by the supervolcano (stock image)

EARTHQUAKE SWARM

Researchers from the University of Utah’s Seismograph Stations (UUSS) have been monitoring the activity since it began last Monday, June 12.

A total of 878 quakes have been recorded over the past fortnight at Yellowstone.

Earthquake swarms are common in Yellowstone and, on average, comprise about 50 per cent of the total activity in the Yellowstone region.

Although the latest swarm is the largest since 2012, it is fewer than weekly counts during similar events in 2002, 2004, 2008 and 2010.

The tremors were recorded at depths from ground level to nine miles (14.5 km) below sea level.

Seismic activity could be a sign of an impending eruption of the supervolcano, although this is currently impossible to predict exactly.

A total of 878 quakes have been recorded over the past fortnight at Yellowstone.

When the earthquakes started on 12 June, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) said it was the highest number of earthquakes at the park within a single week in the past five years.

Researchers from the University of Utah’s Seismograph Stations (UUSS) have been monitoring the activity since it began on Monday, June 12.

The strongest quake of 4.4 magnitude hit on Thursday, June 15.

‘The swarm consists of one earthquake in the magnitude 4 range, 5 earthquakes in the magnitude 3 range, 68 earthquakes in the magnitude 2 range, 277 earthquakes in the magnitude 1 range, 508 earthquakes in the magnitude 0 range, and 19 earthquakes with magnitudes of less than zero’, the report said.

‘Earthquake swarms are common in Yellowstone and, on average, comprise about 50 per cent of the total seismicity in the Yellowstone region’.

‘UUSS will continue to monitor this swarm and will provide updates as necessary.’

UUSS said the quake was part of ‘an energetic sequence’ of earthquakes magnitude two and larger in the area.

A spokesman said: ‘The epicentre of the shock was located in Yellowstone National Park, eight miles north-northeast of the town of West Yellowstone.

‘The earthquake was felt in the towns of West Yellowstone and Gardiner, Montana, in Yellowstone National Park, and elsewhere in the surrounding region.’

Earthquake swarms are common in Yellowstone and, on average, comprise about 50 per cent of the total activity in the Yellowstone region.

Researchers from the University of Utah's Seismograph Stations (UUSS) have been monitoring the activity since it began last Monday, June 12. Pictured  is the he location of the earthquakes that are part of the swarm as  (red symbols)

Researchers from the University of Utah’s Seismograph Stations (UUSS) have been monitoring the activity since it began last Monday, June 12. Pictured  is the he location of the earthquakes that are part of the swarm as (red symbols)

Although the latest swarm is the largest since 2012, it is fewer than weekly counts during similar events in 2002, 2004, 2008 and 2010.

The tremors were recorded at depths from ground level to nine miles (14.5 km) below sea level.

Earthquake swarms are common in Yellowstone and, on average, comprise around 50 per cent of the total seismic activity in the Yellowstone region. Pictured - seismic data for the magnitude 4.4 quake which took place on Thursday, June 15

Earthquake swarms are common in Yellowstone and, on average, comprise around 50 per cent of the total seismic activity in the Yellowstone region. Pictured – seismic data for the magnitude 4.4 quake which took place on Thursday, June 15

The University of Utah is part of the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO), which provides long-term monitoring of volcanic and earthquake activity in the region.

YVO is one of the five United States Geological Survey volcano observatories that monitor volcanoes within the United States for science and public safety.

In a written statement, a spokesman for the team said: ‘Yellowstone hasn’t erupted for 70,000 years, so it’s going to take some impressive earthquakes and ground uplift to get things started.’

‘Besides intense earthquake swarms, we expect rapid and notable uplift around the caldera.

‘Finally, rising magma will cause explosions from the boiling-temperature geothermal reservoirs.

‘Even with explosions, earthquakes and notable ground uplift, the most likely volcanic eruptions would be the type that would have minimal effect outside the park itself.’

Yellowstone is the site of the largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features in the world.

SCIENTISTS FIND A MASSIVE MAGMA CHAMBER UNDER YELLOWSTONE PARK

Previous research found a relatively small magma chamber, known as the upper-crustal magma reservoir, beneath the surface

Previous research found a relatively small magma chamber, known as the upper-crustal magma reservoir, beneath the surface

In the heart of Yellowstone National Park, a supervolcano releases around 45,000 metric tonnes of carbon dioxide each day.

But the magma chamber lying directly beneath its surface is not considered large enough to produce such levels, so researchers have been searching for an alternative source for years.

In April 2015, by tracking seismic waves, geophysicists discovered a huge secondary chamber deeper underground that’s so large its partly-molten rock could fill the Grand Canyon 11 times over.

Previous research found a relatively small magma chamber, known as the upper-crustal magma reservoir, directly beneath the surface in 2013 that measures 2,500 cubic miles (10,420 cubic km).

To discover the latest chamber, Hsin-Hua Huang from the University of Utah and his colleagues tracked seismic waves from almost 5,000 earthquakes.

This USGS graphic shows how a 'super eruption' of the molten lava under Yellowstone National Park would spread ash across the United States

This USGS graphic shows how a ‘super eruption’ of the molten lava under Yellowstone National Park would spread ash across the United States

These readings combined data from the University of Utah Seismograph Stations, which collected shallow readings from nearby quakes in Utah, Idaho, the Teton Range and Yellowstone, and from the Earthscope array, which revealed deeper readings from temblors from more further afield.

Each of these quakes created waves that echoed around the supervolcano.

The movement and structure of these waves could then be used to map the earth beneath.

The researchers said in their paper: ‘The Yellowstone magmatic system from the mantle plume to the upper crust’, published in the journal Science, that the reservoir contains around 98 per cent hot rock.

The remaining 2 per cent is molten rock and is too deep to directly cause an eruption, they added

Seismic activity could be a sign of an impending eruption of the supervolcano, although this is currently impossible to predict exactly.

While it has lain dormant for more than 70,000 years, scientists say that we can’t rule out the possibility eruption may some day take place, although they say the chances are extremely slim.

A magnitude 4.8 earthquake, which hit the park in 2014, was the most powerful to strike the area in nearly 30 years.

In 2013, a study into the super volcano found the underground magma chamber to be 2.5 times larger than previously thought, with the cavern spanning a 56 mile (90km) by 19 miles (30km) area and capable of holding tons of molten rock.

Experts say there is a one in 700,000 annual chance of a volcanic eruption at the site. Pictured is an artist's impression

Experts say there is a one in 700,000 annual chance of a volcanic eruption at the site. Pictured is an artist’s impression

Yellowstone National Park spans the midwestern US states of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana (pictured)

Yellowstone National Park spans the midwestern US states of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana (pictured)

The volcano a sits atop a huge reserve of molten rock that last erupted 640,000 years ago.

It is one of the largest active continental silicic volcanic fields in the world. Silicic is used to describe magma or igneous rock rich in silica.

The Grand Prismatic hot spring in Yellowstone National Park is among the park’s many hydrothermal features created by the Yellowstone supervolcano.

Experts say there is a one in 700,000 annual chance of a volcanic eruption at the site.

If the volcano were ever to erupt, observers say the outflow of lava, ash and smoke would likely devastate the United States and affect the entire world.

THE MASSIVE LAKE OF MOLTEN CARBON THE SIZE OF MEXICO FOUND UNDER YELLOWSTONE

 A huge well of molten carbon that would spell disaster for the planet if released was found under the Yellowstone in February.

Scientists using the world’s largest array of seismic sensors have mapped a deep-Earth area, covering 700,000 sq miles (1.8 million sq km).

This is around the size of Mexico, and researchers say it has the potential to cause untold environmental damage.

The discovery could change our understanding of how much carbon the Earth contains, suggesting it is much more than we previously believed.

A huge well of molten carbon that would spell disaster for the planet if released has been found under the US (stock image) 

A huge well of molten carbon that would spell disaster for the planet if released has been found under the US (stock image)

It would be impossible to drill far enough down to physically ‘see’ the Earth’s mantle, so a team of researchers used a massive group of sensors to paint a picture of it, using mathematical equations to interpret their results.

The study, conducted by geologists at Royal Holloway University in London, used a huge network of 583 seismic sensors that measure the Earth’s vibrations, to create a picture of the area’s deep sub surface.

Known as the upper mantle, this section of the Earth’s interior is known for by its high temperatures where solid carbonates melt, creating distinctive seismic patterns.

Scientists uncovered a huge reservoir of molten carbon situated under the Western US, 217 miles (350km) beneath the Earth's surface

Scientists uncovered a huge reservoir of molten carbon situated under the Western US, 217 miles (350km) beneath the Earth’s surface

What they found was a vast buried deposit of molten carbon, which produces carbon dioxide and other gases, situated under the Western US, 217 miles (350km) beneath the Earth’s surface.

If just a fraction of the carbon found by the Royal Holloway team were released into the atmosphere, it could have grave implications for the planet.

Just one per cent of the CO2 stored would be equivalent to burning 2.3 trillion barrels of oil.

If a substantial amount was released all at once, it could bring about an environmental disaster on the scale of nuclear warfare.

(Check out link for video at bottom.)

Info on Climate Engineering

 Geoengineering Watch Global Alert News, February 11, 2017
88y

Dane Wigington
GeoengineeringWatch.org

The relentless courage and dedication of the VAXXED group continues to expand the wave of vaccine danger awareness. More and more populations around the globe are going hungry, how is it that the grocery shelves in the US are always completely stocked? Where is all this food coming from? Dementia and Alzheimer’s mortality rates have gone exponential. The chemically engineered winter storms in the US continue in spite of record shattering high temperatures. The Arctic pushes 60 degrees above normal while being battered by a category 4 equivalant cyclone. Australia is suffering in a heat wave that experts have called “horrifying”. Locusts are devouring the food crops in Bolivia’s heartland, an official state of emergency has been declared. And there is Fukushima, every time it seems it can’t get any worse, it does. Nearly 500 whales have beached themselves in New Zealand, is this heartbreaking tragedy the result of US/NATO/fossil fuel industry seismic activities in the region? The latest installment of Global Alert News is below.

For many, the darker the horizon grows, the deeper their denial manifests. Each of us must struggle against such a tendency. We are not helpless, we are not without a voice, but we must choose to fully utilize it, no matter how ominous the gathering storm appears to be.
DW

from:    http://www.geoengineeringwatch.org/geoengineering-watch-global-alert-news-february-11-2017/

On the Schumann Resonance

Why Is Earth’s Schumann Resonance Accelerating?

maxresdefaultThe Ancient Indian Rishis called 7.83 Hz the frequency of OM. It also happens to be Mother Earth’s natural heartbeat rhythm, known as the “Schumann Resonance.” According to Wikipedia, “Schumann resonances are global electromagnetic resonances, excited by lightning discharges in the cavity formed by the Earth’s surface and the ionosphere.”

For many years this resonance frequency has hovered at a steady 7.83 Hz with only slight variations. In June 2014 that apparently changed. Monitors at the Russian Space Observing System showed a sudden spike in activity to around 8.5 Hz. Since then, they haveczc499stotliwoc59bc487-schumanna recorded days where the Schumann accelerated as fast as 16.5 Hz. (The graph is usually blue with some green, and no white.) At first they thought their equipment was malfunctioning, but later learned the data was accurate. Everyone was asking, what’s causing this intermittent spiking activity?

Is the Earth’s frequency speeding up? Since the Schumann frequency is said to be “in tune” with the human brain’s alpha and theta states, this acceleration may be why it often feels like time has sped up and events and changes in our life are happening more rapidly.

These emerging resonances are naturally correlated to human brainwave activity. So this means, we are changing. Many years ago I was trained in EEG Neurofeedback, so I looked at what these accelerated frequencies might be telling us about human evolutionary change. A 7.83 Hz frequency is an alpha/theta state. Relaxed, yet dreamy—sort of a neutral idling state waiting for something to happen. A 8.5 – 16.5 Hz frequency moves one out of the theta range into more of a full calmer alpha state with faster more alert beta frequencies starting to appear. (This correlates with slowly waking up cognitively). Since the Schumann Resonance hasSchumann-resonance-before-it-went-down had sudden spikes between 12 – 16.5 Hz (see pic’s white areas),  I found this even more interesting. In Neurofeedback, 12-15 Hz is called Sensory-Motor Rhythm frequency (SMR). It is an ideal state of “awakened calm.” Our thought processes are clearer and more focused, yet we are still “in the flow” or “in the know.” In other words, Mother Earth is shifting her vibrational frequency and perhaps so are we. This may be one of many signs that we are AWAKENING.

Scientist’s report that the Earth’s magnetic field, which can affect the Schumann Resonance, has been slowly weakening for the past 2,000 years and even more so in the last few years. No one really knows why. I was told by a wise old sage from India that the magnetic field of Earth was put in place by the Ancient Ones to block our primordial memories of our true heritage. This was so that souls could learn from the experience of free-will unhampered by memories of the past. He claimed that the magnetic field changes are now loosening those memory blocks and we are raising our consciousness to greater truth. The veil is lifting. The blinders are coming off. If true, it raises even more intriguing questions.

Whatever is happening, it’s clear that this acceleration may make you feel more tired, exhausted, dizzy, depressed, and even strange as you raise your own frequencies to be more “in tune” with the New Earth. Adaptation is not always an easy process, but keep in mind it’s all part of your own unique AWAKENING.

 

Dr. Kathy Forti is a clinical psychologist, inventor of the Trinfinity8 technology, and author of the book, Fractals of God.   amazon.com/author/k

from:    http://www.trinfinity8.com/why-is-earths-schumann-resonance-accelerating/

THe Future Volcanoes of New Hampshire

New England Might Not Be Volcano-Free Forever